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soles

[Spanish saw-les] /Spanish ˈsɔ lɛs/
noun
1.
a plural of sol3 .

sol1

[sohl] /soʊl/
noun, Music.
1.
the syllable used for the fifth tone of a diatonic scale.
2.
(in the fixed system of solmization) the tone G.
Also, so.
Compare sol-fa (def 1).
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English < Latin solve; see gamut

sol2

[sohl, sol] /soʊl, sɒl/
noun
1.
a former coin and money of account of France, the 20th part of a livre and equal to 12 deniers: originally gold, later silver, finally copper, it was discontinued in 1794.
Also, sou.
Compare solidus1 (def 2).
Origin
1575-85; < Old French sol < Late Latin solidus solidus; compare Italian soldo, Spanish sueldo

sole2

[sohl] /soʊl/
noun
1.
the bottom or under surface of the foot.
2.
the corresponding under part of a shoe, boot, or the like, or this part exclusive of the heel.
3.
the bottom, under surface, or lower part of anything.
4.
Carpentry.
  1. the underside of a plane.
  2. soleplate.
5.
Golf. the part of the head of the club that touches the ground.
verb (used with object), soled, soling.
6.
to furnish with a sole, as a shoe.
7.
Golf. to place the sole of (a club) on the ground, as in preparation for a stroke.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English (noun) < Old French < Latin solea sandal, sole, derivative of solum base, bottom
Related forms
soleless, adjective

sol3

[sohl, sol; Spanish sawl] /soʊl, sɒl; Spanish sɔl/
noun, plural sols Spanish, soles
[saw-les] /ˈsɔ lɛs/ (Show IPA)
1.
a bronze coin and monetary unit of Peru, equal to 100 centavos.
Abbreviation: S.
2.
Also called libra. a former gold coin of Peru.
Origin
1880-85; < American Spanish: sun, Spanish < Latin sōl

sole3

[sohl] /soʊl/
noun, plural (especially collectively) sole (especially referring to two or more kinds or species) soles.
1.
a European flatfish, Solea solea, used for food.
2.
any other flatfish of the families Soleidae and Cynoglossidae, having a hooklike snout.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English < Middle French < Old Provençal < Vulgar Latin *sola (for Latin solea; see sole2), so called from its flat shape; compare Spanish suela, Italian soglia, Portuguese solha

sol4

[sawl, sol] /sɔl, sɒl/
noun, Physical Chemistry
1.
a fluid colloidal solution.
Compare aerosol, gel.
Origin
shortened form of hydrosol
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for soles
  • With the exception of the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet you'll note small, fine hairs everywhere.
  • Rolls of leather stand alongside a pile of rubber soles.
  • He set off on his journey wearing three layers of garments and sturdy shoes with bearskin soles.
  • To enjoy the caves safely and comfortably, wear shoes with nonskid soles and take a jacket.
  • No cut in pennies and little dressing and choose wide soles and little spats really little spices.
  • For footgear the traveller needs two pairs of stout, high hunting shoes, built on the moccasin form with soles.
  • She handed him a ten-soles note and asked him to give her a lesson.
  • Designer sneakers aren't necessary, but flat rubber soles won't cut it.
  • Newton claims it makes them more efficient than traditional foam or gel soles that simply absorb energy but don't return it.
  • Which, in combination with the next item in the list, quite literally saved my soles.
British Dictionary definitions for soles

sol1

/sɒl/
noun
1.
(music) another name for soh
Word Origin
C14: see gamut

sol2

/səʊl/
noun
1.
short for new sol
2.
a former French copper or silver coin, usually worth 12 deniers
Word Origin
C16: from Old French, from Late Latin: solidus

sol3

/sɒl/
noun
1.
a colloid that has a continuous liquid phase, esp one in which a solid is suspended in a liquid
Word Origin
C20: shortened from hydrosol

sol4

/sɒl/
noun
1.
(astronomy) a solar day as measured on the planet Mars, equal to 24.65 hours
Word Origin
C20: from Latin sōl the sun

Sol

/sɒl/
noun
1.
the Roman god personifying the sun Greek counterpart Helios
2.
a poetic word for the sun

sole1

/səʊl/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) being the only one; only
2.
(prenominal) of or relating to one individual or group and no other: sole rights on a patent
3.
(law) having no wife or husband See also feme sole
4.
an archaic word for solitary
Derived Forms
soleness, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French soule, from Latin sōlus alone

sole2

/səʊl/
noun
1.
the underside of the foot related adjectives plantar volar
2.
the underside of a shoe
3.
  1. the bottom of a furrow
  2. the bottom of a plough
4.
the underside of a golf-club head
5.
the bottom of an oven, furnace, etc
verb (transitive)
6.
to provide (a shoe) with a sole
7.
(golf) to rest (the club) on the ground, as when preparing to make a stroke
Derived Forms
soleless, adjective
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Latin solea sandal; probably related to solum the ground

sole3

/səʊl/
noun (pl) sole, soles
1.
any tongue-shaped flatfish of the family Soleidae, esp Solea solea (European sole): most common in warm seas and highly valued as food fishes
2.
any of certain other similar fishes
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Vulgar Latin sola (unattested), from Latin solea a sandal (from the fish's shape)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for soles

Sol

n.

"the sun personified," mid-15c. (also in Old English), from Latin sol "the sun, sunlight," from PIE *s(e)wol-, variant of root *saewel- "the sun" (cf. Sanskrit suryah, Avestan hvar "sun, light, heavens;" Greek helios; Lithuanian saule; Old Church Slavonic slunice; Gothic sauil, Old English sol "sun," swegl "sky, heavens, the sun;" Welsh haul, Old Cornish heuul, Breton heol "sun;" Old Irish suil "eye").

The PIE element -*el- in the root originally was a suffix and had an alternative form -*en-, yielding *s(u)wen-, source of English sun (n.). French soleil (10c.) is from Vulgar Latin *soliculus, diminutive of sol; in Vulgar Latin diminutives had the full meaning of their principal words.

sole

n.

"bottom of the foot" ("technically, the planta, corresponding to the palm of the hand," Century Dictionary), early 14c., from Old French sole, from Vulgar Latin *sola, from Latin solea "sandal, bottom of a shoe; a flatfish," from solum "bottom, ground, foundation, lowest point of a thing" (hence "sole of the foot"), of uncertain origin. In English, the meaning "bottom of a shoe or boot" is from late 14c.

common European flatfish, mid-13c., from Old French sole, from Latin solea "a kind of flatfish," originally "sandal" (see sole (n.1)); so called from resemblance of the fish to a flat shoe.

adj.

"single, alone, having no husband or wife; one and only, singular, unique," late 14c., from Old French soul "only, alone, just," from Latin solus "alone, only, single, sole; forsaken; extraordinary," of unknown origin, perhaps related to se "oneself," from PIE reflexive root *swo- (see so).

v.

"furnish (a shoe) with a sole," 1560s, from sole (n.1). Related: Soled; soling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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soles in Medicine

sol (sôl, sōl)
n.
A colloidal dispersion of a solid in a liquid.

sole (sōl)
n.
The underside of the foot.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Slang definitions & phrases for soles

SoHo

noun

The area in New York City that is located south of Houston Street (1970s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Related Abbreviations for soles

SOL

shit out of luck
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for soles

sol

in physical chemistry, a colloid (aggregate of very fine particles dispersed in a continuous medium) in which the particles are solid and the dispersion medium is fluid. If the dispersion medium is water, the colloid may be called a hydrosol; and if air, an aerosol. Lyophobic (Greek: "liquid-hating") sols are characterized by particles that are not strongly attracted to molecules of the dispersion medium and that are relatively easily coagulated and precipitated. Lyophilic ("liquid-loving") sols are more stable and more closely resemble true solutions. Many sols are intermediate between lyophobic and lyophilic types. Compare gel.

Learn more about sol with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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5
6
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