sow

1 [soh]
verb (used with object), sowed, sown or sowed, sowing.
1.
to scatter (seed) over land, earth, etc., for growth; plant.
2.
to plant seed for: to sow a crop.
3.
to scatter seed over (land, earth, etc.) for the purpose of growth.
4.
to implant, introduce, or promulgate; seek to propagate or extend; disseminate: to sow distrust or dissension.
5.
to strew or sprinkle with anything.
verb (used without object), sowed, sown or sowed, sowing.
6.
to sow seed, as for the production of a crop.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English sowen, Old English sāwan; cognate with Dutch zaaien, German säen, Old Norse sā, Gothic saian; akin to seed, Latin sēmen seed, serere to sow

sowable, adjective
sower, noun
unsowed, adjective


4. inject, lodge, circulate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sow1 (səʊ)
 
vb , sows, sowing, sowed, sown, sowed
1.  to scatter or place (seed, a crop, etc) in or on (a piece of ground, field, etc) so that it may grow: to sow wheat; to sow a strip of land
2.  (tr) to implant or introduce: to sow a doubt in someone's mind
 
[Old English sāwan; related to Old Norse sā, Old High German sāen, Old Slavonic seja, Latin serere to sow]
 
'sowable1
 
adj
 
'sower1
 
n

sow2 (saʊ)
 
n
1.  a female adult pig
2.  the female of certain other animals, such as the mink
3.  metallurgy
 a.  the channels for leading molten metal to the moulds in casting pig iron
 b.  iron that has solidified in these channels
 
[Old English sugu; related to Old Norse sӯr, Old High German sū, Latin sūs, Norwegian sugga, Dutch zeug: see swine]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sow
O.E. sawan "to scatter seed upon the ground or plant it in the earth" (class VII strong verb; past tense seow, pp. sawen), from P.Gmc. *sæjanan (cf. O.N. sa, O.S. saian, M.Du. sayen, Du. zaaien, O.H.G. sawen, Ger. säen, Goth. saian), from PIE base *se- (cf. L. sero, pt. sevi, pp. satum "to
sow;" O.C.S. sejo, sejati; Lith. seju, seti "to sow"), source of semen, season (n.), seed, etc. Fig. sense was in O.E.

sow
O.E. sugu, su "female of the swine," from P.Gmc. *sugo (cf. O.S., O.H.G. su, Ger. Sau, Du. zeug, O.N. syr), from PIE base *su- (cf. Skt. sukarah "wild boar, swine;" Avestan hu "wild boar;" Gk. hys "swine;" L. sus "swine," swinus "pertaining to swine;" O.C.S. svinija "swine;" Lett. sivens "young pig;"
Welsh hucc, Ir. suig "swine; O.Ir. socc "snout, plowshare"), possibly imitative of pig noise, a notion reinforced by the fact that Skt. sukharah means "maker of (the sound) 'su.' " Related to swine. As a term of abuse for a woman, attested from 1508.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
SOW
statement of work
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Of course, humans could take over for the missing birds, pollinating by hand
  and sowing the seeds.
There may be poetry in intermediate steps, but sowing and reaping still hold a
  special magic.
One of their goals is the idea of sowing doubt or questioning statistics.
Sowing, rapid growth for twenty-four hours and the appearance of the same
  organism.
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