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spade1

[speyd] /speɪd/
noun
1.
a tool for digging, having an iron blade adapted for pressing into the ground with the foot and a long handle commonly with a grip or crosspiece at the top, and with the blade usually narrower and flatter than that of a shovel.
2.
some implement, piece, or part resembling this.
3.
a sharp projection on the bottom of a gun trail, designed to dig into the earth to restrict backward movement of the carriage during recoil.
verb (used with object), spaded, spading.
4.
to dig, cut, or remove with a spade (sometimes followed by up):
Let's spade up the garden and plant some flowers.
Idioms
5.
call a spade a spade, to call something by its real name; be candidly explicit; speak plainly or bluntly:
To call a spade a spade, he's a crook.
6.
in spades, Informal.
  1. in the extreme; positively:
    He's a hypocrite, in spades.
  2. without restraint; outspokenly:
    I told him what I thought, in spades.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English (noun); Old English spadu; cognate with Dutch spade, German Spaten, Old Norse spathi spade, Greek spáthē broad, flat piece of wood
Related forms
spadelike, adjective
spader, noun
unspaded, adjective

spade2

[speyd] /speɪd/
noun
1.
a black figure shaped like an inverted heart and with a short stem at the cusp opposite the point, used on playing cards.
2.
a card of the suit bearing such figures.
3.
spades.
  1. (used with a singular or plural verb) the suit so marked:
    Spades is trump. Spades count double.
  2. (used with a plural verb) Casino. the winning of seven spades or more.
4.
Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive. a contemptuous term used to refer to a black person.
Origin
1590-1600; < Italian, plural of spada orig., sword < Latin spatha < Greek spáthē; see spade1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for spades
  • Once you get settled, you'll notice that what it does have-in spades-is quiet.
  • Bid whist is similar to spades, except that players can call the trump suit.
  • Scenes featured workers hefting hoes and spades, or farm maidens bearing sheaves and sickles.
  • The large caveats that inevitably apply to mouse studies still apply here, in spades.
  • And this is precisely what the company has done, in spades.
  • What hurts finance affects the rest of the economy in spades.
  • What is true for the developed world is true in spades for emerging markets.
  • The idea now is that reducing debt has the same effect and that reducing debt really, really fast has that effect in spades.
  • We got the first in spades tonight, but there is still no sign of the second.
  • Another suggestion to poor nonmembers to purchase spades and start digging dugouts.
British Dictionary definitions for spades

spade1

/speɪd/
noun
1.
a tool for digging, typically consisting of a flat rectangular steel blade attached to a long wooden handle
2.
  1. an object or part resembling a spade in shape
  2. (as modifier): a spade beard
3.
a heavy metallic projection attached to the trail of a gun carriage that embeds itself into the ground and so reduces recoil
4.
a type of oar blade that is comparatively broad and short Compare spoon (sense 6)
5.
a cutting tool for stripping the blubber from a whale or skin from a carcass
6.
call a spade a spade, to speak plainly and frankly
verb
7.
(transitive) to use a spade on
Derived Forms
spader, noun
Word Origin
Old English spadu; related to Old Norse spathi, Old High German spato, Greek spathē blade

spade2

/speɪd/
noun
1.
  1. the black symbol on a playing card resembling a heart-shaped leaf with a stem
  2. a card with one or more of these symbols or (when pl) the suit of cards so marked, usually the highest ranking of the four
2.
a derogatory word for Black
3.
(informal) in spades, in an extreme or emphatic way
Word Origin
C16: from Italian spada sword, used as an emblem on playing cards, from Latin spatha, from Greek spathē blade, broadsword
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for spades

spade

n.

"tool for digging," Old English spadu, from Proto-Germanic *spadon (cf. Old Frisian spada, Middle Dutch spade, Old Saxon spado, Middle Low German spade, German Spaten), from PIE *spe- "long, flat piece of wood" (cf. Greek spathe "wooden blade, paddle," Old English spon "chip of wood, splinter," Old Norse spann "shingle, chip").

To call a spade a spade "use blunt language, call things by right names" (1540s) translates a Greek proverb (known to Lucian), ten skaphen skaphen legein "to call a bowl a bowl," but Erasmus mistook Greek skaphe "trough, bowl" for a derivative of the stem of skaptein "to dig," and the mistake has stuck.

"figure on playing cards," 1590s, probably from Italian spade, plural of spada "sword, spade," from Latin spatha "broad, flat weapon or tool," from Greek spathe "broad blade" (see spade (n.1)). Phrase in spades "in abundance" first recorded 1929 (Damon Runyon), probably from bridge, where spades are the highest-ranking suit.

The invitations to the musicale came sliding in by pairs and threes and spade flushes. [O.Henry, "Cabbages & Kings," 1904]
Derogatory meaning "black person" is 1928, from the color of the playing card symbol.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for spades

spades

Related Terms

in spades


spade

noun

A black person: The spades inhabited Harlem and let the ofays have Wall Street to themselves

[1928+; fr the color of the playing-card symbol and fr the phrase black as the ace of spades]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with spades
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for spades

trick-taking card game of the whist family that became very popular in the United States in the 1990s, though reportedly some 40 years old by that time. It is played by four players in bridge-style partnerships, each being dealt 13 cards one at a time from a standard 52-card deck. Spades are always the trump suit.

Learn more about spades with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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9
10
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