speakeasy

[speek-ee-zee]
noun, plural speakeasies.
a saloon or nightclub selling alcoholic beverages illegally, especially during Prohibition.

Origin:
1885–90, Americanism; speak + easy

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
speakeasy (ˈspiːkˌiːzɪ)
 
n , pl -easies
(US) a place where alcoholic drink was sold illicitly during Prohibition
 
[C19: from speak + easy (in the sense: gently, quietly)]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

speakeasy
"unlicensed saloon," 1889 (in New York "Voice"), from speak + easy, from the practice of speaking quietly about such a place in public, or when inside it, so as not to alert the police and neighbors. The word gained wide currency in U.S. during Prohibition (1920-1932). In early 19c. Ir. and British dialect,
a speak softly shop meant "smuggler's den."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As the stock market soars to record heights, jazz is played in dance halls and
  speakeasies everywhere.
Bathtub booze, speakeasies, robberies and mob violence resulted.
Speakeasies were created as places for people to drink alcoholic beverages.
Taverns, lounges, speakeasies and supper clubs lined the streets back then.
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