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spiteful

[spahyt-fuh l] /ˈspaɪt fəl/
adjective
1.
full of spite or malice; showing spite; malicious; malevolent; venomous:
a spiteful child.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English; see spite, -ful
Related forms
spitefully, adverb
spitefulness, noun
unspiteful, adjective
unspitefully, adverb
Synonyms
vengeful, mean, cruel, rancorous. Spiteful, revengeful, vindictive refer to a desire to inflict a wrong or injury on someone, usually in return for one received. Spiteful implies a mean or malicious desire for (often petty) revenge: a spiteful attitude toward a former friend. Revengeful implies a deep, powerful, and continued intent to repay a wrong: a fierce and revengeful spirit. Vindictive does not imply action necessarily, but stresses the unforgiving nature of the avenger: a vindictive look.
Antonyms
benevolent.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for spitefully
  • Envy would spur you to spitefully lobby to cut their pensions.
  • The market is depicted as a mechanism in its truest form, not so much spitefully inhuman as routinely dehumanizing.
Word Origin and History for spitefully

spiteful

adj.

mid-15c., from spite + -ful. Related: Spitefully; spitefulness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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