squalid

[skwol-id, skwaw-lid]
adjective
1.
foul and repulsive, as from lack of care or cleanliness; neglected and filthy.
2.
wretched; miserable; degraded; sordid.

Origin:
1585–95; < Latin squālidus dirty, equivalent to squāl(ēre) to be dirty, encrusted + -idus -id4

squalidly, adverb
squalidness, squalidity [skwo-lid-i-tee] , noun


1. unclean. See dirty.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
squalid (ˈskwɒlɪd)
 
adj
1.  dirty and repulsive, esp as a result of neglect or poverty
2.  sordid
 
[C16: from Latin squālidus, from squālēre to be stiff with dirt]
 
squalidity
 
n
 
'squalidness
 
n
 
'squalidly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

squalid
1591, from M.Fr. squalide, from L. squalidus "rough, coated with dirt, filthy," related to squales "filth," squalus "filthy," squalare "be covered with a rough, scaly layer, be coated with dirt, be filthy," of uncertain origin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The urban poor often lived and worked in squalid and dangerous conditions.
Finding potable water is a problem for those living in squalid camps, but it
  may not be their biggest concern.
The only landscapes he noticed were window-views of houses and his own squalid
  gardens, full of buddleia, which he also painted.
Their severity typically reflects the level of development: the more squalid a
  country, the more virulent the cholera.
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