squall

1 [skwawl]
noun
1.
a sudden, violent gust of wind, often accompanied by rain, snow, or sleet.
2.
a sudden disturbance or commotion.
verb (used without object)
3.
to blow as a squall.

Origin:
1690–1700; perhaps special use of squall2

squallish, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

squall

2 [skwawl]
verb (used without object)
1.
to cry or scream loudly and violently: The hungry baby began to squall.
verb (used with object)
2.
to utter in a screaming tone.
noun
3.
the act or sound of squalling: The baby's squall was heard next door.

Origin:
1625–35; perhaps < Old Norse skvala shriek, cry; compare Swedish, Norwegian skvala splash, stream

squaller, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
squall1 (skwɔːl)
 
n
1.  a sudden strong wind or brief turbulent storm
2.  any sudden commotion or show of temper
 
vb
3.  (intr) to blow in a squall
 
[C18: perhaps a special use of squall²]
 
'squallish1
 
adj
 
'squally1
 
adj

squall2 (skwɔːl)
 
vb
1.  (intr) to cry noisily; yell
 
n
2.  a shrill or noisy yell or howl
 
[C17: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic skvala to shout; see squeal]
 
'squaller2
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

squall
"sudden, violent gust of wind," 1719, originally nautical, probably from a Scand. source (cf. Norw. skval "sudden rush of water," Sw. skvala "to gush, pour down"), probably ult. a derivative of squall (v.).

squall
"cry out loudly," 1631, probably from O.N. skvala "to cry out," of imitative origin (cf. squeal).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
squall   (skwôl)  Pronunciation Key 
A brief, sudden, violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow. A squall is said to occur if a wind having a sustained speed of 40 km (25 mi) per hour lasts at least 1 minute and then decreases rapidly. See also squall line.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

squall

as used by weather forecasters, a sudden wind-speed increase of 8 metres per second (18 miles per hour) or more, for one minute or longer. It includes several briefer wind-speed changes, or gusts. A squall is often named for the weather phenomenon that accompanies it, such as rain, hail, or thunder; a line squall is one associated with a squall line of thunderstorms that is often hundreds of kilometres long.

Learn more about squall with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
We did get blown around a bit by this squall but thankfully managed to avoid
  the water spout.
It counts the destruction of the redwoods and the loss of our natural wonder in
  chaotic squall.
On a clear day, they resemble the jawbone of a shark and bear the aggrieved
  purple color of an approaching squall.
In the wee hours, a sudden snow squall descended on the mountain, smothering
  the climbers in blowing snow.
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