squall

1 [skwawl]
noun
1.
a sudden, violent gust of wind, often accompanied by rain, snow, or sleet.
2.
a sudden disturbance or commotion.
verb (used without object)
3.
to blow as a squall.

Origin:
1690–1700; perhaps special use of squall2

squallish, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

squall

2 [skwawl]
verb (used without object)
1.
to cry or scream loudly and violently: The hungry baby began to squall.
verb (used with object)
2.
to utter in a screaming tone.
noun
3.
the act or sound of squalling: The baby's squall was heard next door.

Origin:
1625–35; perhaps < Old Norse skvala shriek, cry; compare Swedish, Norwegian skvala splash, stream

squaller, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
squall1 (skwɔːl)
 
n
1.  a sudden strong wind or brief turbulent storm
2.  any sudden commotion or show of temper
 
vb
3.  (intr) to blow in a squall
 
[C18: perhaps a special use of squall²]
 
'squallish1
 
adj
 
'squally1
 
adj

squall2 (skwɔːl)
 
vb
1.  (intr) to cry noisily; yell
 
n
2.  a shrill or noisy yell or howl
 
[C17: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic skvala to shout; see squeal]
 
'squaller2
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

squall
"sudden, violent gust of wind," 1719, originally nautical, probably from a Scand. source (cf. Norw. skval "sudden rush of water," Sw. skvala "to gush, pour down"), probably ult. a derivative of squall (v.).

squall
"cry out loudly," 1631, probably from O.N. skvala "to cry out," of imitative origin (cf. squeal).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
squall   (skwôl)  Pronunciation Key 
A brief, sudden, violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow. A squall is said to occur if a wind having a sustained speed of 40 km (25 mi) per hour lasts at least 1 minute and then decreases rapidly. See also squall line.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
The photo above is from a somewhat protected area of the mountainside as one of
  these snow squalls approached.
The weather has been generally overcast with lots of snow squalls and moderate
  to heavy seas.
In fact, during rain squalls, they actually use them as umbrellas.
Parachutes open too late or squalls of wind send a jumper into a cliff.
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