squatter

[skwot-er]
noun
1.
a person or thing that squats.
2.
a person who settles on land or occupies property without title, right, or payment of rent.
3.
a person who settles on land under government regulation, in order to acquire title.

Origin:
1775–85; squat + -er1

squatterdom, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

squat

[skwot]
verb (used without object), squatted or squat, squatting.
1.
to sit in a low or crouching position with the legs drawn up closely beneath or in front of the body; sit on one's haunches or heels.
2.
to crouch down or cower, as an animal.
3.
to settle on or occupy property, especially otherwise unoccupied property, without any title, right, or payment of rent.
4.
to settle on public land under government regulation, in order to acquire title.
5.
Nautical. (of a vessel, especially a power vessel) to draw more water astern when in motion forward than when at rest.
verb (used with object), squatted or squat, squatting.
6.
to cause to squat.
7.
to occupy (property) as a squatter.
adjective, squatter, squattest.
8.
(of a person, animal, the body, etc.) short and thickset.
9.
low and thick or broad: The building had a squat shape.
10.
seated or being in a squatting position; crouching.
noun
11.
the act or fact of squatting.
12.
a squatting position or posture.
13.
a weightlifting exercise in which a person squats and then returns to an erect position while holding a barbell at the back of the shoulders.
14.
Nautical. the tendency of a vessel to draw more water astern when in motion than when stationary.
15.
Slang. doodly-squat.
16.
a place occupied by squatters.

Origin:
1250–1300; (v.) Middle English squatten < Old French esquater, esquatir, equivalent to es- ex-1 + quatir < Vulgar Latin *coactīre to compress, equivalent to Latin coāct(us), past participle of cōgere to compress (co- co- + ag(ere) to drive + -tus past participle suffix) + -īre infinitive suffix; (noun) Middle English, derivative of the v.; (adj.) Middle English: in a squatting position, orig., past participle of the v.

squatly, adverb
squatness, noun


8. dumpy, stocky, square.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
squat (skwɒt)
 
vb , squats, squatting, squatted
1.  to rest in a crouching position with the knees bent and the weight on the feet
2.  to crouch down, esp in order to hide
3.  (tr) law to occupy land or property to which the occupant has no legal title
4.  weightlifting to crouch down to one's knees and rise to a standing position while holding (a specified weight) behind one's neck
 
adj
5.  Also: squatty short and broad: a squat chair
 
n
6.  a squatting position
7.  weightlifting an exercise in which a person crouches down and rises up repeatedly while holding a barbell at shoulder height
8.  a house occupied by squatters
 
[C13: from Old French esquater, from es-ex-1 + catir to press together, from Vulgar Latin coactīre (unattested), from Latin cōgere to compress, from co- + agere to drive]
 
'squatly
 
adv
 
'squatness
 
n

squatter (ˈskwɒtə)
 
n
1.  a person who occupies property or land to which he has no legal title
2.  in Australia
 a.  (formerly) a person who occupied a tract of land, esp pastoral land, as tenant of the Crown
 b.  a farmer of sheep or cattle on a large scale
3.  (in New Zealand) a 19th-century settler who took up large acreage on a Crown lease

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

squat
c.1410, "crouch on the heels," from O.Fr. esquatir "press down, lay flat, crush," from es- "out" (from L. ex-) + O.Fr. quatir "press down, flatten," from V.L. *coactire "press together, force," from L. coactus, pp. of cogere "to compel, curdle, collect" (see cogent). Slang
sense of "nothing at all" first attested 1934, probably suggestive of squatting to defecate. The adjective sense of "short, thick" dates from 1630. Squatter "settler who occupies land without legal title" first recorded 1788; in ref. to paupers or homeless people in uninhabited buildings, it is recorded from 1880.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

squatter

in 19th-century Australian history, an illegal occupier of crown grazing land beyond the prescribed limits of settlement. The inroad of squatters contributed to the growth of the country's wool industry and to the development of a powerful social class in Australian life. By the late 1840s the authorities recognized the economic good derived from the squatters' activity and issued them leases for their sheep runs and tenure extending as long as 14 years. By this time the squatters had a hold on the land; many had become wealthy grandees.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Squatter families move into these forests to grow their patches of millet and
  maize.
My goal is to change the, look of squatter communities world wide.
From perspective of landlord, they have a major squatter problem.
The party bosses may snub her, but she remains hugely popular among the
  poorest, the people of squatter camps and tin shacks.
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