stagnate

[stag-neyt]
verb (used without object), stagnated, stagnating.
1.
to cease to run or flow, as water, air, etc.
2.
to be or become stale or foul from standing, as a pool of water.
3.
to stop developing, growing, progressing, or advancing: My mind is stagnating from too much TV.
4.
to be or become sluggish and dull: When the leading lady left, the show started to stagnate.
verb (used with object), stagnated, stagnating.
5.
to make stagnant.

Origin:
1660–70; < Latin stāgnātus (past participle of stāgnāre), equivalent to stāgn(um) pool of standing water + -ātus -ate1

stagnation, noun
stagnatory [stag-nuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
unstagnating, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
stagnate (stæɡˈneɪt, ˈstæɡˌneɪt)
 
vb
(intr) to be or to become stagnant
 
stag'nation
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

stagnate
1665 (implied in stagnation), from L. stagnatum, stagnatus, pp. of stagnare "to stagnate," from stagnatum "standing water," from PIE base *stag- "to seep drip" (cf. Gk. stazein "to ooze, drip;" see stalactite).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As with all monopolies, they are stagnating and preventing real progress.
Water stagnating in the holes will shortly add the peril of epidemic disease.
Bush and his cronies have been stagnating the market for six years.
She was becoming one of the world's best figure skaters, but she felt she was
  stagnating.
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