stagnation

[stag-ney-shuhn]
noun
1.
the state or condition of stagnating, or having stopped, as by ceasing to run or flow: Meteorologists forecast ozone and air stagnation.
2.
a foulness or staleness, as one emanating from a standing pool of water.
3.
a failure to develop, progress, or advance: periods of economic stagnation followed by bursts of growth.
4.
the state or quality of being or feeling sluggish and dull: Happily, they have been able to avoid stagnation in their ten-year marriage.

Origin:
stagn(ate) + -ation

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World English Dictionary
stagnate (stæɡˈneɪt, ˈstæɡˌneɪt)
 
vb
(intr) to be or to become stagnant
 
stag'nation
 
n

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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

stagnation stag·na·tion (stāg-nā'shən)
n.

  1. The retardation or cessation of the flow of blood in the blood vessels, as in passive congestion.

  2. The accumulation of a normally circulating fluid in a part or an organ.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Even if continuing stagnation should slow greenhouse gas-caused climate change,
  the damage already done is extremely serious.
Cultural and political stagnation presses painfully.
While short-term stimulus is important, long-term stagnation is an enemy that
  should also be fought.
New oil wealth masks stagnation in the rest of the economy and widespread
  poverty.
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