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stereoscopy

[ster-ee-os-kuh-pee, steer-] /ˌstɛr iˈɒs kə pi, ˌstɪər-/
noun
1.
the study of the stereoscope and its techniques.
2.
three-dimensional vision.
Origin
1860-1865
1860-65; stereo- + -scopy
Related forms
stereoscopist, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for stereoscopist

stereoscopy

/ˌstɛrɪˈɒskəpɪ; ˌstɪər-/
noun
1.
the viewing or appearance of objects in or as if in three dimensions
2.
the study and use of the stereoscope
Derived Forms
stereoscopist, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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stereoscopist in Medicine

stereoscopy ster·e·os·co·py (stěr'ē-ŏs'kə-pē, stēr'-)
n.
An optical technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for stereoscopist

stereoscopy

science and technology dealing with two-dimensional drawings or photographs that when viewed by both eyes appear to exist in three dimensions in space. A popular term for stereoscopy is 3-D. Stereoscopic pictures are produced in pairs, the members of a pair showing the same scene or object from slightly different angles that correspond to the angles of vision of the two eyes of a person looking at the object itself. Stereoscopy is possible only because of binocular vision, which requires that the left-eye view and the right-eye view of an object be perceived from different angles. In the brain the separate perceptions of the eyes are combined and interpreted in terms of depth, of different distances to points and objects seen. Stereoscopic pictures are viewed by some means that presents the right-eye image to the right eye and the left-eye image to the left. An experienced observer of stereopairs may be able to achieve the proper focus and convergence without special viewing equipment (e.g., a stereoscope); ordinarily, however, some device is used that allows each eye to see only the appropriate picture of the pair. To produce a three-dimensional effect in motion pictures (see 3-D), various systems have been employed, all involving simultaneous projection on the screen of left- and right-eye images distinguished by, for example, different colour or polarization and the use by the audience of binocular viewing filters to perceive the images properly. In holography the two eyes see two reconstructed images (light-interference patterns) as if viewing the imaged object normally, at slightly different angles.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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