stipulatio

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stipulatio

in Roman law, a form of contract based upon a simple question and answer. It had no parallel in other legal systems. Stipulatio developed, at first, with very strict rules. Although no witnesses were required, both parties had to be present during the entire proceedings, which had to be one continuous act. The contract was oral and had to be made in Latin. The stipulator asked, "Spondes?" ("Do you promise?") and the promisor answered, "Spondeo" ("I promise"). The form could be used only by citizens; other forms were open to noncitizens.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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