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strychnine

[strik-nin, -neen, -nahyn] /ˈstrɪk nɪn, -nin, -naɪn/
noun
1.
Pharmacology. a colorless, crystalline poison, C 2 1 H 2 2 N 2 O 2 , obtained chiefly by extraction from the seeds of nux vomica, formerly used as a central nervous system stimulant.
2.
an Indian tree, Strychnos nux-vomica, of the logania family, having small, yellowish-white flowers in clusters, berrylike fruit, and seeds that yield strychnine.
Also, strychnia
[strik-nee-uh] /ˈstrɪk ni ə/ (Show IPA),
strychnina
[strik-ni-nuh] /ˈstrɪk nɪ nə/ (Show IPA)
.
Origin
1810-1820
1810-20; < French, equivalent to Neo-Latin Strychn(os) genus name (< Greek strýchnos a kind of nightshade) + French -ine -ine2
Related forms
strychnic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for strychnine
  • Toxic compounds, such as strychnine and other common plant alkaloids, often have a strong bitter taste.
  • Around the corner sits the dispensary where she first encountered an array of lethal poisons, including arsenic and strychnine.
  • Macaws eat seeds containing alkaloids, a group of chemicals that has some notoriously toxic members, such as strychnine.
  • While brucine is related to strychnine, it is not as poisonous.
  • Both brucine and strychnine are commonly used as agents for chiral resolution.
British Dictionary definitions for strychnine

strychnine

/ˈstrɪkniːn/
noun
1.
a white crystalline very poisonous alkaloid, obtained from the plant nux vomica: formerly used in small quantities as a stimulant of the central nervous system and the appetite. Formula: C21H22O2N2
Word Origin
C19: via French from New Latin Strychnos, from Greek strukhnos nightshade
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for strychnine

powerful poisonous alkaloid, 1819, from French strychnine, from Modern Latin Strychnos, the genus name of the plant (nux vomica) from which the poison is obtained, from Greek strychnon, a kind of nightshade, of uncertain origin. The chemical was discovered 1818 by Pelletier and Caventou.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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strychnine in Medicine

strychnine strych·nine (strĭk'nīn', -nĭn, -nēn')
n.
An extremely poisonous white crystalline alkaloid used as a poison for rodents and formerly used topically as a central nervous system stimulant.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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strychnine in Science
strychnine
  (strĭk'nīn')   
An extremely poisonous, white crystalline compound derived from the seeds of the nux vomica tree. Strychnine is an alkaloid and was formerly used in medicine to stimulate the nervous system. It is currently used as a rat poison. Chemical formula: C21H22O2N2.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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