styluses

stylus

[stahy-luhs]
noun, plural styli [stahy-lahy] , styluses.
1.
an instrument of metal, bone, or the like, used by the ancients for writing on waxed tablets, having one end pointed for incising the letters and the other end blunt for rubbing out writing and smoothing the tablet.
2.
any of various pointed, pen-shaped instruments used in drawing, artwork, etc.
3.
Computers. a pen-shaped device used on a display screen to input commands or handwritten text or drawings. Compare joystick ( def 2 ), mouse ( def 4 ).
4.
Audio.
a.
Also called cutting stylus. a needle used for cutting grooves in making a disk recording to be played on a phonograph.
b.
a needle for reproducing the sounds of a phonograph record.
5.
any of various pointed wedges used to punch holes in paper or other material, as in writing Braille.
6.
any of various kinds of pens for tracing a line automatically, as on a recording seismograph or electrocardiograph.
Also, style (for defs 1, 2).


Origin:
1720–30; < Latin: spelling variant of stilus stake, pointed writing instrument; spelling with -y- from fancied derivation < Greek stŷlos column

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World English Dictionary
stylus (ˈstaɪləs)
 
n , pl -li, -luses
1.  Also called: style a pointed instrument for engraving, drawing, or writing
2.  a tool used in ancient times for writing on wax tablets, which was pointed at one end and blunt at the other for erasing mistakes
3.  a device attached to the cartridge in the pick-up arm of a record player that rests in the groove in the record, transmitting the vibrations to the sensing device in the cartridge. It consists of or is tipped with a hard material, such as diamond or sapphire
 
[C18: from Latin, variant of stilus writing implement; see style]
 
'stylar
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

stylus
1728, "stem-like part of a flower pistil," alteration of L. stilus "stake, stylus;" spelling influenced by Gk. stylos "pillar" (see stet). Meaning "instrument for writing" is from 1807.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

stylus sty·lus (stī'ləs)
n. pl. sty·lus·es or sty·li (-lī)

  1. A pencil-shaped structure.

  2. A pencil-shaped medicinal preparation for external application; as a medicated bougie.

  3. See stylet.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

styluses

pointed instrument for writing and marking. The stylus was used in ancient times as a tool for writing on parchment or papyrus. The early Greeks incised letters on wax-covered boxwood tablets using a stylus made of a pointed shaft of metal, bone, or ivory. In the Middle Ages, schoolboys in Europe used similar instruments to write on wooden tablets coated with black or green wax, producing whitish marks that could be erased by rubbing with the rounded end. In modern times, a stylus is used for cutting stencils in duplicating or other reproduction processes and, in the phonograph industry, to cut the original grooves in phonograph records; the needle used to play phonograph records is also called a stylus

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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