sub concealed

conceal

[kuhn-seel]
verb (used with object)
1.
to hide; withdraw or remove from observation; cover or keep from sight: He concealed the gun under his coat.
2.
to keep secret; to prevent or avoid disclosing or divulging: to conceal one's identity by using a false name.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English conselen, concelen < Anglo-French conceler < Latin concēlāre, equivalent to con- con- + cēlāre to hide (akin to hull1, Greek koleón scabbard (see Coleoptera); cf. occult)

concealable, adjective
concealability, noun
concealedly, adverb
concealedness, noun
concealer, noun
half-concealed, adjective
half-concealing, adjective
preconceal, verb (used with object)
reconceal, verb (used with object)
semiconcealed, adjective
subconcealed, adjective
unconcealed, adjective
unconcealing, adjective
unconcealingly, adverb
well-concealed, adjective


1. See hide1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
conceal (kənˈsiːl)
 
vb
1.  to keep from discovery; hide
2.  to keep secret
 
[C14: from Old French conceler, from Latin concēlāre, from com- (intensive) + cēlāre to hide]
 
con'cealable
 
adj
 
con'cealer
 
n
 
con'cealment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

conceal
1292, from O.Fr. conceler "to hide," from L. concelare "to hide," from com- "together" + celare "to hide," from PIE base *kel- "to hide" (see cell). Replaced O.E. deagan.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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