subdue

[suhb-doo, -dyoo]
verb (used with object), subdued, subduing.
1.
to conquer and bring into subjection: Rome subdued Gaul.
2.
to overpower by superior force; overcome.
3.
to bring under mental or emotional control, as by persuasion or intimidation; render submissive.
4.
to repress (feelings, impulses, etc.).
5.
to bring (land) under cultivation: to subdue the wilderness.
6.
to reduce the intensity, force, or vividness of (sound, light, color, etc.); tone down; soften.
7.
to allay (inflammation, infection, etc.).

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English so(b)duen, so(b)dewen < Anglo-French *soduer to overcome, Old French soduire to deceive, seduce < Latin subdūcere to withdraw (see subduct); meaning in E (and Anglo-French) < Latin subdere to place beneath, subdue

subduable, adjective
subduableness, noun
subduably, adverb
subduer, noun
subduingly, adverb
presubdue, verb (used with object), presubdued, presubduing.
unsubduable, adjective


1. subjugate, vanquish. See defeat. 3. tame, break, discipline. 3, 4. suppress.


4. awaken, arouse. 6. intensify.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
subdue (səbˈdjuː)
 
vb , -dues, -duing, -dued
1.  to establish ascendancy over by force
2.  to overcome and bring under control, as by intimidation or persuasion
3.  to hold in check or repress (feelings, emotions, etc)
4.  to render less intense or less conspicuous
 
[C14 sobdue, from Old French soduire to mislead, from Latin subdūcere to remove; English sense influenced by Latin subdere to subject]
 
sub'duable
 
adj
 
sub'duably
 
adv
 
sub'dual
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

subdue
late 14c., "to conquer," from O.Fr. souduire "deceive, seduce," from L. subducere "draw, lead away, withdraw" (see subduce). The sense seems to have been taken over in Anglo-Fr. from L. subdere. Subduct in the sense of "subtract" is from 1570s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The silica will likely continue to dry out and disaggregate over time, subduing
  evidence of the explosive activity.
Before they could escape, an officer in a guard tower opened fire on them,
  killing one and subduing the others.
Though of motley origin, the colonists proved more than equal to subduing the
  wilderness.
The researchers found that larger size did improve wolves' skill at
  strength-related tasks, such as subduing elk.
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