submergence

submerge

[suhb-murj]
verb (used with object), submerged, submerging.
1.
to put or sink below the surface of water or any other enveloping medium.
2.
to cover or overflow with water; immerse.
3.
to cover; bury; subordinate; suppress: His aspirations were submerged by the necessity of making a living.
verb (used without object), submerged, submerging.
4.
to sink or plunge under water or beneath the surface of any enveloping medium.
5.
to be covered or lost from sight.

Origin:
1600–10; < Latin submergere, equivalent to sub- sub- + mergere to dip, immerse; see merge

submergence, noun
nonsubmergence, noun
resubmerge, verb, resubmerged, resubmerging.
unsubmerging, adjective


1. submerse. 2. flood, inundate, engulf.
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World English Dictionary
submerge or submerse (səbˈmɜːdʒ, səbˈmɜːs)
 
vb
1.  to plunge, sink, or dive or cause to plunge, sink, or dive below the surface of water, etc
2.  (tr) to cover with water or some other liquid
3.  (tr) to hide; suppress
4.  (tr) to overwhelm, as with work, difficulties, etc
 
[C17: from Latin submergere, from sub- + mergere to immerse]
 
submerse or submerse
 
vb
 
[C17: from Latin submergere, from sub- + mergere to immerse]
 
sub'mergence or submerse
 
n
 
submersion or submerse
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

submerge
1606, from L. submergere "to plunge under, sink, overwhelm," from sub "under" + mergere "to plunge, immerse" (see merge). Intransitive use is from 1652, made common 20c. in connection with submarines.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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