suborn

[suh-bawrn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to bribe or induce (someone) unlawfully or secretly to perform some misdeed or to commit a crime.
2.
Law.
a.
to induce (a person, especially a witness) to give false testimony.
b.
to obtain (false testimony) from a witness.

Origin:
1525–35; < Latin subornāre to instigate secretly, orig., to supply, equivalent to sub- sub- + ornāre to equip; see adorn

subornation [suhb-awr-ney-shuhn] , noun
subornative [suh-bawr-nuh-tiv] , adjective
suborner, noun
unsuborned, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
suborn (səˈbɔːn)
 
vb
1.  to bribe, incite, or instigate (a person) to commit a wrongful act
2.  criminal law to induce (a witness) to commit perjury
 
[C16: from Latin subornāre, from sub- secretly + ornāre to furnish]
 
subornation
 
n
 
subornative
 
adj
 
sub'orner
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

suborn
"to procure by bribery, to lure (someone) to commit a crime," 1528 (implied in subornation), from M.Fr. suborner (13c.), from L. subornare "suborn," originally "equip," from sub "under, secretly" + ornare "equip," related to ordo "order."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Conspiracy to suborn perjury may be prosecuted irrespective of whether perjury has been committed.
Drug-trafficking revenues exacerbated corruption by enabling trafficking organizations to suborn government officials.
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