follow Dictionary.com

Why turkey has the same name as Turkey

subsidy

[suhb-si-dee] /ˈsʌb sɪ di/
noun, plural subsidies.
1.
a direct pecuniary aid furnished by a government to a private industrial undertaking, a charity organization, or the like.
2.
a sum paid, often in accordance with a treaty, by one government to another to secure some service in return.
3.
a grant or contribution of money.
4.
money formerly granted by the English Parliament to the crown for special needs.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English subsidie < Anglo-French < Latin subsidium auxiliary force, reserve, help, equivalent to sub- sub- + sid-, combining form of sedēre to sit1 + -ium -ium
Related forms
antisubsidy, noun, plural antisubsidies.
nonsubsidy, noun, plural nonsubsidies.
Synonyms
1. Subsidy, subvention are both grants of money, especially governmental, to aid private undertakings. A subsidy is usually given to promote commercial enterprise: a subsidy to manufacturers during a war. A subvention is usually a grant to stimulate enterprises connected with science and the arts: a subvention to a research chemist by a major company.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for subsidies
  • Critics say that farm subsidies today have little to do with helping struggling family farmers.
  • Governments should end subsidies to renewable energies and let consumers determine winners and losers.
  • Best of all, the government subsidies made it significantly cheaper.
  • The same is absolutely true for sugar subsidies by the way.
  • They support their families on government subsidies.
  • The president also repeats his call to end subsidies for the fossil fuel industry.
  • But closing the loophole, lawmakers determined, also denied subsidies to disabled students.
  • The truth about federal energy subsidies, including federal subsidies for ethanol, is that they have to be phased out.
  • Putting a solar array on the roof will pay for itself within a few years, even without subsidies.
  • Governments should be far more selective about which biofuel crops they support through subsidies and tax benefits.
British Dictionary definitions for subsidies

subsidy

/ˈsʌbsɪdɪ/
noun (pl) -dies
1.
a financial aid supplied by a government, as to industry, for reasons of public welfare, the balance of payments, etc
2.
(English history) a financial grant made originally for special purposes by Parliament to the Crown
3.
any monetary contribution, grant, or aid
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-Norman subsidie, from Latin subsidium assistance, from subsidēre to remain, from sub- down + sedēre to sit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for subsidies

subsidy

n.

late 14c., from Anglo-French subsidie, from Old French subside "help, aid, contribution," from Latin subsidium "help, aid, assistance, (military) reinforcements," from sub "behind, near" (see sub-) + sedere "to sit" (see sedentary).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
subsidies in Culture

subsidy definition


A grant made by a government to some individual or business in order to maintain an acceptable standard of living or to stimulate economic growth.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for subsidy

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for subsidies

12
14
Scrabble Words With Friends