subtunic

tunic

[too-nik, tyoo-]
noun
1.
Chiefly British. a coat worn as part of a military or other uniform.
2.
a gownlike outer garment, with or without sleeves and sometimes belted, worn by the ancient Greeks and Romans.
3.
a woman's upper garment, either loose or close-fitting and extending over the skirt to the hips or below.
4.
a garment with a short skirt, worn by women for sports.
5.
Ecclesiastical. a tunicle.
6.
Anatomy, Zoology. any covering or investing membrane or part, as of an organ.
7.
Botany. an integument, as that covering a seed.

Origin:
before 900; (< French tunique) < Latin tunica; perhaps also continuing Old English tunece, tunica < Latin

subtunic, noun
supertunic, noun
undertunic, noun
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World English Dictionary
tunic (ˈtjuːnɪk)
 
n
1.  any of various hip-length or knee-length garments, such as the loose sleeveless garb worn in ancient Greece or Rome, the jacket of some soldiers, or a woman's hip-length garment, worn with a skirt or trousers
2.  anatomy, botany, zoology See also tunica a covering, lining, or enveloping membrane of an organ or part
3.  chiefly RC Church another word for tunicle
 
[Old English tunice (unattested except in the accusative case), from Latin tunica]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tunic
c.1600, from M.Fr. tunique, from L. tunica (cf. Sp. tunica, It. tonica, O.E. tunece, O.H.G. tunihha), probably from a Semitic source (cf. Heb. kuttoneth "coat," Aramaic kittuna).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

tunic tu·nic (tōō'nĭk, tyōō'-)
n.
A coat or layer enveloping an organ or a part; tunica.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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