succor

[suhk-er]
noun
1.
help; relief; aid; assistance.
2.
a person or thing that gives help, relief, aid, etc.
verb (used with object)
3.
to help or relieve.
Also, especially British, succour.


Origin:
1250–1300; (v.) Middle English sucuren < Old French suc(c)urre, socorre < Latin succurrere to go beneath, run to help, equivalent to suc- suc- + currere to run (see current); (noun) Middle English soc(o)ur, back formation from sucurs (taken as plural) < Old French < Medieval Latin succursus, equivalent to Latin succur(rere) + -sus, var of -tus suffix of v. action

succorable, adjective
succorer, noun
nonsuccor, noun
unsuccorable, adjective
unsuccored, adjective

succor, sucker.


1, 3. support. 3. See help.


See -or1.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
succour or succor (ˈsʌkə)
 
n
1.  help or assistance, esp in time of difficulty
2.  a person or thing that provides help
 
vb
3.  (tr) to give aid to
 
[C13: from Old French sucurir, from Latin succurrere to hurry to help, from sub- under + currere to run]
 
succor or succor
 
n
 
vb
 
[C13: from Old French sucurir, from Latin succurrere to hurry to help, from sub- under + currere to run]
 
'succourable or succor
 
adj
 
'succorable or succor
 
adj
 
'succourer or succor
 
n
 
'succorer or succor
 
n
 
'succourless or succor
 
adj
 
'succorless or succor
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

succor
early 13c., from Anglo-Fr. succors "help, aid," O.Fr. sucurres, from M.L. succursus "help, assistance," from pp. of L. succurrere "run to help," from sub "up to" + currere "to run" (see current). Final -s mistaken as a plural inflexion and dropped late 13c.

succour
British spelling of succor (q.v.); for suffix, see -or.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Welfare reform also provides some intellectual succour to the recently beleaguered right.
As these trends converge, diasporas will move even closer to centre stage in the delivery of succour to the needy.
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