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or sugar cane

[shoo g-er-keyn] /ˈʃʊg ərˌkeɪn/
a tall grass, Saccharum officinarum, of tropical and warm regions, having a stout, jointed stalk, and constituting the chief source of sugar.
Origin of sugarcane
1560-70; sugar + cane Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for sugar cane
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • As the animal drives this roller around, the sugar cane is pressed through.

    Fil and Filippa John Stuart Thomson
  • And down in the flat land by the shore, sugar cane was growing.

    Sign of the Green Arrow Roy J. (Roy Judson) Snell
  • Jump up quickly,” said the Camel, “it makes me hungry just to think of sugar cane.

  • I witnessed the sugar cane harvest in the north in full swing.

    The Amazing Argentine John Foster Fraser
  • sugar cane came to the islands in the hulls of the great canoes those early Polynesians sailed across the Pacific.

    Oahu Traveler's guide Bill Gleasner
  • sugar cane in these countries is always called for brevity cane.

    The English in the West Indies James Anthony Froude
  • Succulent plants are full of juice; as, the stalk of the sugar cane.

    Orthography Elmer W. Cavins
British Dictionary definitions for sugar cane

sugar cane

a coarse perennial grass, Saccharum officinarum, of Old World tropical regions, having tall stout canes that yield sugar: widely cultivated in tropical regions Compare sugar beet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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