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superfluous man

a character type whose frequent recurrence in 19th-century Russian literature is sufficiently striking to make him a national archetype. He is usually an aristocrat, intelligent, well-educated, and informed by idealism and goodwill but incapable, for reasons as complex as Hamlet's, of engaging in effective action. Although he is aware of the stupidity and injustice surrounding him, he remains a bystander. The term gained wide currency with the publication of Ivan Turgenev's story "The Diary of a Superfluous Man" (1850). Although most of Turgenev's heroes fall into this category, he was not the first to create the type. Aleksandr Pushkin introduced the type in Eugene Onegin (1833), the story of a Byronic youth who wastes his life, allows the girl who loves him to marry another, and lets himself be drawn into a duel in which he kills his best friend. The most extreme example of this character is the hero of Ivan Goncharov's Oblomov (1859). An idle, daydreaming noble who lives on the income of an estate he never visits, Oblomov spends all his time lying in bed thinking about what he will do when (and if) he gets up

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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