superstitions

superstition

[soo-per-stish-uhn]
noun
1.
a belief or notion, not based on reason or knowledge, in or of the ominous significance of a particular thing, circumstance, occurrence, proceeding, or the like.
2.
a system or collection of such beliefs.
3.
a custom or act based on such a belief.
4.
irrational fear of what is unknown or mysterious, especially in connection with religion.
5.
any blindly accepted belief or notion.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin superstitiōn- (stem of superstitiō), equivalent to superstit- (stem of superstes) standing beyond, outliving (super- super- + -stit-, combining form of stat-, adj. derivative of stāre to stand) + -iōn- -ion

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World English Dictionary
superstition (ˌsuːpəˈstɪʃən)
 
n
1.  irrational belief usually founded on ignorance or fear and characterized by obsessive reverence for omens, charms, etc
2.  a notion, act or ritual that derives from such belief
3.  any irrational belief, esp with regard to the unknown
 
[C15: from Latin superstitiō dread of the supernatural, from superstāre to stand still by something (as in amazement)]

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