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supplement

[n. suhp-luh-muh nt; v. suhp-luh-ment] /n. ˈsʌp lə mənt; v. ˈsʌp ləˌmɛnt/
noun
1.
something added to complete a thing, supply a deficiency, or reinforce or extend a whole.
2.
a part added to a book, document, etc., to supply additional or later information, correct errors, or the like.
3.
a part, usually of special character, issued as an additional feature of a newspaper or other periodical.
4.
Geometry. the quantity by which an angle or an arc falls short of 180° or a semicircle.
verb (used with object)
5.
to complete, add to, or extend by a supplement.
6.
to form a supplement or addition to.
7.
to supply (a deficiency).
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Latin supplēmentum that by which anything is made full, equivalent to sup- sup- + plē- (stem of plēre to fill; see full1) + -mentum -ment
Related forms
supplementer, noun
unsupplemented, adjective
well-supplemented, adjective
Can be confused
appendix, index, supplement (see synonym study at appendix)
complement, supplement (see synonym study at complement)
Synonyms
2. addendum, epilogue, postscript. See appendix. 5. See complement.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for supplements
  • The supplements industry claims its products can boost your intelligence.
  • The squalene added to food, cosmetics, and health supplements is generally derived from shark liver oil.
  • Dietary supplements are another way to get the vitamins you need if the food you eat is not supplying enough vitamins.
  • Individual supplements of any vitamin or food chemical have not shown any benefits.
  • People with peptic ulcers should avoid citrate supplements, or discuss using non-tablet forms with their doctor.
  • There is little evidence that chia seeds or supplements promote weight loss.
  • Iron is a mineral found in many over-the-counter supplements.
  • Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements and medicines you take.
  • Vitamins and minerals in supplements are synthetic forms of the nutrients.
  • Because researchers have found that people who take dietary supplements may make less healthful choices.
British Dictionary definitions for supplements

supplement

noun (ˈsʌplɪmənt)
1.
an addition designed to complete, make up for a deficiency, etc
2.
a section appended to a publication to supply further information, correct errors, etc
3.
a magazine or section inserted into a newspaper or periodical, such as one with colour photographs issued every week
4.
(geometry)
  1. either of a pair of angles whose sum is 180°
  2. an arc of a circle that when added to another arc forms a semicircle Abbreviation sup, supp
verb (ˈsʌplɪˌmɛnt)
5.
(transitive) to provide a supplement to, esp in order to remedy a deficiency
Derived Forms
supplementation, noun
supplementer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin supplēmentum, from supplēre to supply1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for supplements

supplement

n.

late 14c., from Latin supplementum "something added to supply a deficiency," from supplere (see supply (v.)).

v.

1829, from supplement (n.). Related: Supplemented; supplementing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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17
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