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swagger

[swag-er] /ˈswæg ər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to walk or strut with a defiant or insolent air.
2.
to boast or brag noisily.
verb (used with object)
3.
to bring, drive, force, etc., by blustering.
noun
4.
swaggering manner, conduct, or walk; ostentatious display of arrogance and conceit.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; swag1 + -er6
Related forms
swaggerer, noun
outswagger, verb (used with object)
Synonyms
1. See strut1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for swagger
  • He does scholarship with an often irreverent swagger.
  • She had the swagger of a good controller, a real pro.
  • It's the side of him that loves the limelight and accounts for the swagger that creeps into his conversation.
  • Alas, as with the economy, the commentators had mistaken swagger for authentic talent.
  • Columnists and bloggers even call for army bosses to fall on their swagger sticks.
  • For all their swagger, it seems that their success depended as much on their co-workers as their innate talents.
  • And in his internal defeat-the whimper behind the swagger-he relies on her to set his ambition in motion.
  • Wood's strikeout proficiency and swagger overcame his weaknesses.
  • After eight years of misgovernance, it has lost some of its global swagger but also some of its arrogance.
  • He rarely invites any sympathy at all, and his unrepentant swagger says he wouldn't be caught dead trying.
British Dictionary definitions for swagger

swagger1

/ˈswæɡə/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to walk or behave in an arrogant manner
2.
(intransitive) often foll by about. to brag loudly
3.
(transitive) (rare) to force, influence, etc, by blustering
noun
4.
arrogant gait, conduct, or manner
adjective
5.
(Brit, informal, rare) elegantly fashionable
Derived Forms
swaggerer, noun
swaggering, adjective
swaggeringly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: probably from swag

swagger2

/ˈswæɡə/
noun
1.
other names for swagman
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for swagger
v.

1590, first recorded in Shakespeare ("Midsummer Night's Dream"), probably a frequentative form of swag (v.). Related: Swaggered; swaggering. The noun is attested from 1725.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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