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swag1

[swag] /swæg/
noun
1.
a suspended wreath, garland, drapery, or the like, fastened up at or near each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon.
2.
a wreath, spray, or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit.
3.
a festoon, especially one very heavy toward the center.
4.
a swale.
5.
a swaying or lurching movement.
verb (used without object), swagged, swagging.
6.
to move heavily or unsteadily from side to side or up and down; sway.
7.
to hang loosely and heavily; sink down.
verb (used with object), swagged, swagging.
8.
to cause to sway, sink, or sag.
9.
to hang or adorn with swags.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian svaga, svagga to sway, rock

swag2

[swag] /swæg/
noun
1.
Slang.
  1. plunder; booty.
  2. money; valuables.
2.
Australian. a traveler's bundle containing personal belongings, cooking utensils, food, or the like.
verb (used without object), swagged, swagging.
3.
Australian. to travel about carrying one's bundle of personal belongings.
Origin
1860-65; special uses of swag1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for swagging

swag

/swæɡ/
noun
1.
(slang) property obtained by theft or other illicit means
2.
(slang) goods; valuables
3.
an ornamental festoon of fruit, flowers, or drapery or a representation of this
4.
a swaying movement; lurch
5.
(Midland English, dialect) a depression filled with water, resulting from mining subsidence
6.
(Austral & NZ, informal) (formerly) a swagman's pack containing personal belongings
7.
(Austral & NZ, informal) go on the swag, to become a tramp
8.
(Austral & NZ, informal) swags of, lots of
verb swags, swagging, swagged
9.
(mainly Brit) to lurch or sag or cause to lurch or sag
10.
(transitive) to adorn or arrange with swags
11.
(intransitive) (Austral, informal) to tramp about carrying a pack of personal belongings
Word Origin
C17: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian svagga to sway
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for swagging

swag

v.

"to move heavily or unsteadily," 1520s, probably from Old Norse sveggja "to swing, sway," cognate with Old English swingan "to swing" (see swing). Related: Swagged; swagging.

n.

"ornamental festoon," 1794, from swag (v.). Colloquial sense of "promotional material" (from recording companies, etc.) was in use by 2001; swag was English criminal's slang for "quantity of stolen property, loot" from c.1839. Earlier senses of "bulky bag" (c.1300) and "big, blustering fellow" (1580s) may represent separate borrowings from the Scandinavian source. Swag lamp attested from 1966.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for swagging

swagging

noun

Getting money or property illegally, esp by pilfering government property or by taking illegal payoffs or tips: a lack of hard evidence that ''swagging'' or tipping had actually taken place

[1846+; apparently revived in the 1960s]


swag

noun
  1. Stolen goods, money, etc; loot (1794+)
  2. Souvenirs, etc, sold at rock-and-roll concerts: Somehow, these trifling collectibles came to be known as swag (1990s+)

[probably fr the swag, ''sack,'' in which loot might be carried]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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14
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