swagging

swag

1 [swag]
noun
1.
a suspended wreath, garland, drapery, or the like, fastened up at or near each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon.
2.
a wreath, spray, or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit.
3.
a festoon, especially one very heavy toward the center.
4.
a swale.
5.
a swaying or lurching movement.
verb (used without object), swagged, swagging.
6.
to move heavily or unsteadily from side to side or up and down; sway.
7.
to hang loosely and heavily; sink down.
verb (used with object), swagged, swagging.
8.
to cause to sway, sink, or sag.
9.
to hang or adorn with swags.

Origin:
1520–30; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian svaga, svagga to sway, rock

Dictionary.com Unabridged

swag

2 [swag]
noun
1.
Slang.
a.
plunder; booty.
b.
money; valuables.
2.
Australian. a traveler's bundle containing personal belongings, cooking utensils, food, or the like.
verb (used without object), swagged, swagging.
3.
Australian. to travel about carrying one's bundle of personal belongings.

Origin:
1860–65; special uses of swag1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
swag (swæɡ)
 
n
1.  slang property obtained by theft or other illicit means
2.  slang goods; valuables
3.  an ornamental festoon of fruit, flowers, or drapery or a representation of this
4.  a swaying movement; lurch
5.  dialect (Midland English) a depression filled with water, resulting from mining subsidence
6.  informal (Austral), (NZ) (formerly) a swagman's pack containing personal belongings
7.  informal (Austral), (NZ) go on the swag to become a tramp
8.  informal (Austral), (NZ) swags of lots of
 
vb , swags, swagging, swagged
9.  chiefly (Brit) to lurch or sag or cause to lurch or sag
10.  (tr) to adorn or arrange with swags
11.  informal (Austral) (intr) to tramp about carrying a pack of personal belongings
 
[C17: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian svagga to sway]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

swag
"to move heavily or unsteadily," 1530, probably from O.N. sveggja "to swing, sway," cognate with O.E. swingan "to swing" (see swing). The noun sense of "ornamental festoon" is first found 1794. Earlier senses of "bulky bag" (c.1300) and "big, blustering fellow" (1588) may
represent separate borrowings from the Scand. source.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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