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swerve

[swurv] /swɜrv/
verb (used without object), swerved, swerving.
1.
to turn aside abruptly in movement or direction; deviate suddenly from the straight or direct course.
verb (used with object), swerved, swerving.
2.
to cause to turn aside:
Nothing could swerve him.
noun
3.
an act of swerving; turning aside.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English swerven (v.); Old English sweorfan to rub, file; cognate with Dutch zwerven to rove, Old High German swerban, Old Norse sverfa to file, Gothic afswairban to wipe off
Related forms
unswerved, adjective
unswerving, adjective
unswervingly, adverb
unswervingness, noun
Synonyms
1. See deviate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for swerved
  • On a lonely northern stretch, he swerved to avoid one, only to see it flattened by a lorry behind him.
  • Megaphone preachers find no audience except themselves, and only add another obstacle to be swerved around.
  • The car's back end swerved around, tires smoking, brake lights blazing.
  • He swerved to avoid stepping on me, so instead he pulled the cart across my body.
  • Finally, the narrator slammed on his brakes and swerved onto an exit.
  • At the last moment, unaccountably, it swerved toward them.
  • Worth swerved to the left to avoid this car, but as he did, one end of the board caught on the fender.
  • He knew that if he swerved, he would veer into the next lane and cause an accident.
  • He was half way over when a taxi charged at him, swerved and nipped a fraction of an inch off his tail.
  • Planes looped and swerved and dived and arced and sent colorful sprays of vapor over the pandemonium below.
British Dictionary definitions for swerved

swerve

/swɜːv/
verb
1.
to turn or cause to turn aside, usually sharply or suddenly, from a course
2.
(transitive) to avoid (a person or event)
noun
3.
the act, instance, or degree of swerving
Derived Forms
swervable, adjective
swerver, noun
Word Origin
Old English sweorfan to scour; related to Old High German swerban to wipe off, Gothic afswairban to wipe off, Old Norse sverfa to file
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for swerved
swerve
early 13c., "to depart, make off;" early 14c., "to turn aside, deviate from a straight course," probably from O.E. sweorfan "to rub, scour, file" (but sense development is difficult to trace), from P.Gmc. *swerbanan (cf O.N. sverfa "to scour, file," O.S. swebran "to wipe off"), from PIE base *swerbh-. Cognate words in other Germanic languages (cf. O.Fris. swerva "to creep," M.Du. swerven "to rove, stray") suggests the sense of "go off, turn aside" may have existed in O.E., though unrecorded. The noun is recorded from 1741.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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14
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