swingingest

swinging

[swing-ing]
adjective, superlative swingingest.
1.
characterized by or capable of swinging, being swung, or causing to swing.
2.
intended for swinging upon, by, from, or in: the swinging devices in a playground.
3.
Slang. excellent; first-rate.
4.
Slang. lively, active, and modern; hip.
5.
Slang.
a.
free and uninhibited sexually: a swinging bachelor.
b.
exchanging spouses for sex: swinging married couples.
noun
6.
the activity or act of a person who swings.
7.
Slang.
a.
the act or practice of being free and uninhibited sexually.
b.
the exchanging of spouses for sex.

Origin:
1550–60; swing1 + -ing2

swingingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
swinging (ˈswɪŋɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  moving rhythmically to and fro
2.  slang modern and lively
 
n
3.  slang the practice of swapping sexual partners in a group, esp habitually
 
'swingingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

swing
O.E. swingan "to rush, fling oneself," from P.Gmc. *swenganan (cf. O.S., O.H.G. swingan, O.Fris. swinga, Ger. schwingen "to swing, swingle, oscillate") denoting "violent circulatory motion." The meaning "move freely back and forth" is first recorded 1545. The noun meaning "a stroke with a weapon" is
from 1375; sense of "an apparatus that swings" is first recorded 1687. Meaning "shift of public opinion" is from 1899. The meaning "variety of big dance-band music with a swinging rhythm" is first recorded 1933, though the sense has been traced back to 1888; its heyday was from mid-30s to mid-40s. Swinging "uninhibited" dates from 1958; and swinger "person who is lively in an unrestrained way" is from 1965. Both had various other slang senses traceable to 1590s. Swing shift first recorded 1941, typically 4 p.m. to midnight. Phrase in full swing "in total effect or operation" (1570) is probably from bell-ringing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

swing definition


A kind of jazz generally played by a “Big Band” and characterized by a lively rhythm suitable for dancing. The bands of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Glenn Miller played swing.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang Dictionary

swinging definition


  1. mod.
    great. : The concert was swinging—nothing like it, ever.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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