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synesthesia

[sin-uh s-thee-zhuh, -zhee-uh, -zee-uh] /ˌsɪn əsˈθi ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə/
noun
1.
a sensation produced in one modality when a stimulus is applied to another modality, as when the hearing of a certain sound induces the visualization of a certain color.
Also, synaesthesia.
Origin
1890-1895
1890-95; < Neo-Latin; see syn-, esthesia
Related forms
synesthete
[sin-uh s-theet] /ˈsɪn əsˌθit/ (Show IPA),
noun
synesthetic
[sin-uh s-thet-ik] /ˌsɪn əsˈθɛt ɪk/ (Show IPA),
adjective
nonsynesthetic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for synesthete

synesthesia

/ˌsɪniːsˈθiːzɪə/
noun
1.
the usual US spelling of synaesthesia
Derived Forms
synesthetic (ˌsɪniːsˈθɛtɪk) adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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synesthete in Medicine

synesthesia syn·es·the·sia (sĭn'ĭs-thē'zhə)
n.

  1. A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.

  2. A sensation felt in one part of the body as a result of stimulus that is applied to another, as in referred pain.


syn'es·thet'ic (-thět'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for synesthete

synesthesia

a condition in which one type of sensory stimulation creates perception in another sense. The most common form of synesthesia is called "coloured hearing," where a person experiences a visual sensation when receiving an auditory signal (for example, hearing the musical tone C and seeing the colour red). Although tone-colour relationships are not identical for all people, there are general uniformities: the deeper a musical note, the darker the colour. Similar colour perceptions, called photisms, may accompany sensations of taste, touch, pain, smell, or temperature. Synesthesia has been used as a literary device by poets as diverse as Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Rimbaud, Hart Crane, and Dame Edith Sitwell.

Learn more about synesthesia with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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