talisman

[tal-is-muhn, -iz-]
noun, plural talismans.
1.
a stone, ring, or other object, engraved with figures or characters supposed to possess occult powers and worn as an amulet or charm.
2.
any amulet or charm.
3.
anything whose presence exercises a remarkable or powerful influence on human feelings or actions.

Origin:
1630–40; < French or SpanishArabic ṭilasm < Greek télesma payment, equivalent to teles- (variant stem of teleîn to complete, perform) + -ma noun suffix of result

talismanic [tal-is-man-ik, -iz-] , talismanical, adjective
talismanically, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
talisman (ˈtælɪzmən)
 
n , pl -mans
1.  a stone or other small object, usually inscribed or carved, believed to protect the wearer from evil influences
2.  anything thought to have magical or protective powers
 
[C17: via French or Spanish from Arabic tilsam, from Medieval Greek telesma ritual, from Greek: consecration, from telein to perform a rite, complete, from telos end, result]
 
talismanic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

talisman
1630s, from Fr. talisman, in part via Arabic tilsam (pl. tilsaman), a Gk. loan-word; in part directly from Byzantine Gk. telesma "talisman, religious rite, payment," earlier "consecration, ceremony," originally "completion," from telein "perform (religious rites), pay (tax), fulfill," from telos "completion,
end, tax" (see tele-).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
These are not talismanic objects, the collegiate version of a lucky rabbit's
  foot.
Part of that should be that an advanced degree is not some kind of talismanic
  key to advanced placement in the work world.
Nor has it made the cause of wider home ownership something of talismanic
  importance.
The talismanic power of certain images was not confined to ecclesiastical
  settings.
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