tame

[teym]
adjective, tamer, tamest.
1.
changed from the wild or savage state; domesticated: a tame bear.
2.
without the savageness or fear of humans normal in wild animals; gentle, fearless, or without shyness, as if domesticated: That lion acts as tame as a house cat.
3.
tractable, docile, or submissive, as a person or the disposition.
4.
lacking in excitement; dull; insipid: a very tame party.
5.
spiritless or pusillanimous.
6.
not to be taken very seriously; without real power or importance; serviceable but harmless: They kept a tame scientist around.
7.
brought into service; rendered useful and manageable; under control, as natural resources or a source of power.
8.
cultivated or improved by cultivation, as a plant or its fruit.
verb (used with object), tamed, taming.
9.
to make tame; domesticate; make tractable.
10.
to deprive of courage, ardor, or zest.
11.
to deprive of interest, excitement, or attractiveness; make dull.
12.
to soften; tone down.
13.
to harness or control; render useful, as a source of power.
14.
to cultivate, as land or plants.
verb (used without object), tamed, taming.
15.
to become tame.

Origin:
before 900; (adj.) Middle English; Old English tam; cognate with Dutch tam, German zahm, Old Norse tamr; (v.) Middle English tamen, derivative of the adj.; replacing Middle English temen to tame, Old English temian, derivative of tam; cognate with Old Norse temja, Gothic gatamjan; akin to Latin domāre to tame

tamely, adverb
tameness, noun
tamer, noun
overtame, adjective
overtamely, adverb
overtameness, noun
untame, adjective
untamely, adverb
untameness, noun
untamed, adjective
well-tamed, adjective


3. meek, subdued. 4. flat, empty, vapid, boring, tedious, uninteresting. 5. cowardly, dastardly. 9. break, subdue. 12. calm, mollify.


1. wild.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tame (teɪm)
 
adj
1.  changed by man from a naturally wild state into a tractable, domesticated, or cultivated condition
2.  (of animals) not fearful of human contact
3.  lacking in spirit or initiative; meek or submissive: a tame personality
4.  flat, insipid, or uninspiring: a tame ending to a book
5.  slow-moving: a tame current
 
vb
6.  to make tame; domesticate
7.  to break the spirit of, subdue, or curb
8.  to tone down, soften, or mitigate
 
[Old English tam; related to Old Norse tamr, Old High German zam]
 
'tamable
 
adj
 
'tameable
 
adj
 
tama'bility
 
n
 
tamea'bility
 
n
 
'tamableness
 
n
 
'tameableness
 
n
 
'tameless
 
adj
 
'tamely
 
adv
 
'tameness
 
n
 
'tamer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tame
O.E. tom, tam "domesticated, docile," from P.Gmc. *tamaz (cf. O.N. tamr, O.S., O.Fris., M.L.G., M.Du. tam, O.H.G. zam, Ger. zahm "tame," Goth. tamjan "to tame"), from PIE *deme- "to constrain, to force, to break (horses)" (cf. Skt. damayati "tames;" Pers. dam "a tame animal;" Gk. daman "to tame, subdue,"
dmetos "tame;" L. domare "to tame, subdue;" O.Ir. damnaim "I tie up, fasten, I tame, subdue"). Possible ulterior connection with PIE *dem- "house, household" (see domestic). Meaning "spiritless, weak, dull" is recorded from 1602. The verb is M.E. teme, from O.E. temian "make tame;" form altered 14c. by infl. of the adj.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
If you click the link above, you will see that the wiki is a lot tamer than it
  used to be.
Having deleted bears from the morning's plans, our guide was forced to focus on
  nature's tamer delights.
Neither plant commends itself to lovers of tamer flowers.
It pleased the audience, and a tamer film edition of this story might have
  disappointed the crowds.
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