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[tek-nol-uh-jee] /tɛkˈnɒl ə dʒi/
noun, plural technologies for 4.
the branch of knowledge that deals with the creation and use of technical means and their interrelation with life, society, and the environment, drawing upon such subjects as industrial arts, engineering, applied science, and pure science.
the application of this knowledge for practical ends.
the terminology of an art, science, etc.; technical nomenclature.
a scientific or industrial process, invention, method, or the like.
the sum of the ways in which social groups provide themselves with the material objects of their civilization.
Origin of technology
1605-15; < Greek technología systematic treatment. See techno-, -logy
Related forms
antitechnology, noun
supertechnology, noun, plural supertechnologies. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for technology
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Try to tell this to the champions of technology who predicted the paperless office and who now predict the networked world.

  • The Ministry of Science and technology had sent up a lengthy one.

    Ministry of Disturbance Henry Beam Piper
  • Understanding the degree of necessity of the technology in the first place is where the focus should be.

  • technology at this level uncouples the past from the present.

  • He couldn't duplicate the weapon—the technology required lies so far beyond this age.

    The Time Traders Andre Norton
British Dictionary definitions for technology


noun (pl) -gies
the application of practical sciences to industry or commerce
the methods, theory, and practices governing such application: a highly developed technology
the total knowledge and skills available to any human society for industry, art, science, etc
Derived Forms
technological (ˌtɛknəˈlɒdʒɪkəl) adjective
technologically, adverb
technologist, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Greek tekhnologia systematic treatment, from tekhnē art, skill
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for technology

1610s, "discourse or treatise on an art or the arts," from Greek tekhnologia "systematic treatment of an art, craft, or technique," originally referring to grammar, from tekhno- (see techno-) + -logy. The meaning "science of the mechanical and industrial arts" is first recorded 1859. High technology attested from 1964; short form high-tech is from 1972.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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technology in Science
  1. The use of scientific knowledge to solve practical problems, especially in industry and commerce.

  2. The specific methods, materials, and devices used to solve practical problems.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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technology in Technology

Marketroid jargon for "software", "hardware", "protocol" or something else too technical to name.
The most flagrant abuse of this word has to be "Windows NT" (New Technology) - Microsoft's attempt to make the incorporation of some ancient concepts into their OS sound like real progress. The irony, and even the meaning, of this seems to be utterly lost on Microsoft whose Windows 2000 start-up screen proclaims "Based on NT Technology", (meaning yet another version of NT, including some Windows 95 features at last).
See also: solution.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010
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