tedious

[tee-dee-uhs, tee-juhs]
adjective
1.
marked by tedium; long and tiresome: tedious tasks; a tedious journey.
2.
wordy so as to cause weariness or boredom, as a speaker or writer; prolix.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin tēdiōsus, Late Latin taediōsus. See tedium, -ous

tediously, adverb
tediousness, noun
overtedious, adjective
overtediously, adverb
overtediousness, noun
untedious, adjective
untediously, adverb


1. wearing, boring, tiring, monotonous, dull.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tedious (ˈtiːdɪəs)
 
adj
1.  causing fatigue or tedium; monotonous
2.  obsolete progressing very slowly
 
'tediously
 
adv
 
'tediousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tedious
1412, from O.Fr. tedieus, from L.L. tædiosus "wearisome, irksome, tedious," from L. tædium (see tedium).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The cocoons were then put in hot water to facilitate the difficult and tedious
  task of extracting the silk.
Simply memorizing terms and place locations can be tedious and even boring.
The process may sound elementary, but it's extremely tedious and
  labor-intensive.
Counting endangered plants and animals is often tedious and sometimes dangerous.
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