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tenacity

[tuh-nas-i-tee] /təˈnæs ɪ ti/
noun
1.
the quality or property of being tenacious.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; < Latin tenācitās equivalent to tenāc- (stem of tenāx) holding fast, derivative of tenēre to hold + -itās -ity2
Related forms
overtenacity, noun
untenacity, noun
Synonyms
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for tenacity
  • The point is, adjuncts can solve their office-space problems with some resourcefulness and tenacity.
  • Foremost of all is the lesson of tenacity, of stubborn fixity of purpose.
  • The study of a habit of mind, with its tenacity of life, is an instructive and entertaining branch of history.
  • There is nothing surprising in this extraordinary tenacity.
  • But he more than made up for it with strength and tenacity.
  • Physiological ecologists conducting studies on these popular laboratory invertebrates praise the horseshoe crab's great tenacity.
  • Their tenacity and volume are based on what they see.
  • In part, the cedars' tenacity may be explained by the help they receive from other members of the cliff ecosystem.
  • Eventually, he called the fight a draw, although the company clearly supported the tenacity of the underdog.
  • But it is unlikely that anyone will match her tenacity in trying to make the stories come true.
Word Origin and History for tenacity
tenacity
1520s, from M.Fr. ténacité (14c.), from L. tenacitas "the act of holding fast," from tenax (gen. tenacis) "tough, holding fast," from tenere "to hold" (see tenet).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
14
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