follow Dictionary.com

Hone in vs. home in? What's the difference?

tend1

[tend] /tɛnd/
verb (used without object)
1.
to be disposed or inclined in action, operation, or effect to do something:
The particles tend to unite.
2.
to be disposed toward an idea, emotion, way of thinking, etc.:
He tends to be overly optimistic. Her religious philosophy tends toward pantheism.
3.
to lead or conduce, as to some result or resulting condition:
measures tending to improved working conditions; Governments are tending toward democracy.
4.
to be inclined to or have a tendency toward a particular quality, state, or degree:
This wine tends toward the sweet side.
5.
(of a journey, course, road, etc.) to lead or be directed in a particular direction (usually followed by to, toward, etc.):
a path tending toward the beach.
Origin of tend1
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English tenden < Middle French tendre < Latin tendere to stretch, extend, proceed
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for tend toward
Historical Examples
  • Make a list of those that tend toward worse conditions for the mass of men.

    The Principles of Economics Frank A. Fetter
  • One and all of these, from first to last, tend toward Devolution.

  • August 22, 1688, it was thought I was about coming out of prison, and everything seemed to tend toward it.

    The Autobiography of Madame Guyon Jeanne Marie Bouvier de La Motte Guyon
  • This will tend toward sureness and give eyes to your fingers, so to speak.

    Piano Playing Josef Hofmann
  • A night's imprisonment did not tend toward making the suspect any more communicative.

    The Crime of the Century Henry M. Hunt
  • And not so unwise a choice, if your dreams only tend toward results.

    Bob Hampton of Placer Randall Parrish
  • All his mental processes, as we have seen, tend toward hypochondria, unless his sense of truth can be called into play.

  • Possibly these two species are competitive and tend toward mutual exclusion.

    Birds from North Borneo Max C. Thompson
  • All exercise should tend toward using all of the muscles of the body.

  • The psychological forces which tend toward individualism have been already stated to be the self-assertive instincts and impulses.

    Ethics John Dewey and James Hayden Tufts
British Dictionary definitions for tend toward

tend1

/tɛnd/
verb when intr, usually foll by to or towards
1.
(when transitive, takes an infinitive) to have a general disposition (to do something); be inclined: children tend to prefer sweets to meat
2.
(intransitive) to have or be an influence (towards a specific result); be conducive: the party atmosphere tends to hilarity
3.
(intransitive) to go or move (in a particular direction): to tend to the south
Word Origin
C14: from Old French tendre, from Latin tendere to stretch

tend2

/tɛnd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to care for: to tend wounded soldiers
2.
when intr, often foll by to. to attend (to): to tend to someone's needs
3.
(transitive) to handle or control: to tend a fire
4.
(informal, mainly US & Canadian) (intransitive) often foll by to. to pay attention
Word Origin
C14: variant of attend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for tend toward

tend

v.

"to incline, to move in a certain direction," mid-14c., from Old French tendre "stretch, hold forth, offer" (11c.), from Latin tendere "to aim, stretch, extend" (see tenet).

"attend to," early 14c., a shortening of Middle English atenden (see attend).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for tend

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for tend

5
6
Scrabble Words With Friends