tergiversate

[tur-ji-ver-seyt]
verb (used without object), tergiversated, tergiversating.
1.
to change repeatedly one's attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc.; equivocate.
2.
to turn renegade.

Origin:
1645–55; < Latin tergiversātus (past participle of tergiversārī to turn one's back), equivalent to tergi- (combining form of tergum back) + versātus, past participle of versāre, frequentative of vertere to turn; see -ate1

tergiversation, noun
tergiversator, tergiversant [tur-ji-vur-suhnt] , noun
tergiversatory [tur-ji-vur-suh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
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World English Dictionary
tergiversate (ˈtɜːdʒɪvəˌseɪt)
 
vb
1.  to change sides or loyalties; apostatize
2.  to be evasive or ambiguous; equivocate
 
[C17: from Latin tergiversārī to turn one's back, from tergum back + vertere to turn]
 
tergiver'sation
 
n
 
'tergiversator
 
n
 
tergiversant
 
n
 
tergi'versatory
 
adj

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Word Origin & History

tergiversation
turning dishonestly from a straightforward action or statement; shifting, shuffling, equivocation, 1570, from L. tergiversationem (nom. tergiversatio) "a shifting, evasion," from tergiversari "turn one's back on, evade," from tergum "the back" (of unknown origin) + versare "to spin, turn" (see
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Conscience can tolerate no excuse, no de vice, no shift for such tergiversation.
There is less hesitation, less tergiversation, and there are fewer pirouettes.
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