the great

Akbar

[ak-bahr]
noun
("the Great"; Jalal-ud-Din Mohammed) 1542–1605, Mogul emperor of India 1556–1605.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Basil

[baz-uhl, bas-, bey-zuhl, -suhl]
noun
1.
Saint. Also, Basilius, ("the Great") a.d. 329?–379, bishop of Caesarea in Asia Minor (brother of Saint Gregory of Nyssa).
2.
a male given name: from a Greek word meaning “royal.”

Constantine I

[kon-stuhn-teen, -tahyn]
noun
1.
(Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus"the Great") a.d. 288?–337, Roman emperor 324–337: named Constantinople as the new capital; legally sanctioned Christian worship.
2.
1868–1923, king of Greece 1913–17, 1920–22.

Constantinian [kon-stuhn-tin-ee-uhn] , adjective
post-Constantinian, adjective

Cyrus

[sahy-ruhs]
noun
1.
("the Elder"or"the Great") c600–529 b.c, king of Persia 558?–529: founder of the Persian empire.
2.
("the Younger") 424?–401 b.c, Persian prince and satrap: leader of the armed conspiracy against his brother King Artaxerxes II.
3.
a male given name: from an Old Persian word meaning “throne.”

Darius I

[duh-rahy-uhs]
noun
(Darius Hystaspes"the Great") 558?–486? b.c, king of Persia 521–486.

Dionysius of Alexandria, Saint

noun
("the Great") a.d. c190–265, patriarch of Alexandria 247?–265?.

Herod

[her-uhd]
noun
("the Great") 73?–4 b.c, king of Judea 37–4.

John I

noun
1.
Saint, died a.d. 526, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 523–526.
2.
("the Great") 1357–1433, king of Portugal 1385–1433.

Kamehameha I

[kah-mey-hah-mey-hah, kuh-mey-uh-mey-uh]
noun
("the Great") 1737?–1819, king of the Hawaiian Islands 1810–19.

Louis XIV

noun
("the Great"; "the Sun King") 1638–1715, king of France 1643–1715 (son of Louis XIII).

Medici

[med-i-chee; Italian me-dee-chee]
noun
1.
Catherine de', Catherine de Médicis.
2.
Cosmo or Cosimo de' [kawz-maw or kaw-zee-maw de] , ("the Elder") 1389–1464, Italian banker, statesman, and patron of art and literature.
3.
Cosmo or Cosimo de' ("the Great") 1519–74, duke of Florence and first grand duke of Tuscany.
4.
Giovanni de' [jaw-vahn-nee de] , Leo X.
5.
Giulio de' [joo-lyaw de] , Clement VII.
6.
Lorenzo de' [law-ren-tsaw de] , ("Lorenzo the Magnificent") 1449–92, poet and patron of the arts and literature: ruler of Florence 1478–92 (father of Leo X).
7.
Maria de' [muh-ree-uh duh; Italian mah-ree-ah de] , Marie de Médicis.

Medicean [med-i-see-uhn, chee-uhn] , adjective

Mithridates VI

[mith-ri-dey-teez]
noun
("the Great") 132?–63 b.c, king of Pontus 120–63.
Also called Mithridates Eupator [yoo-puh-tawr] .

Otto I

noun
("the Great") a.d. 912–973, king of the Germans 936–973; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 962–973.

Peter I

noun
1.
("the Great") 1672–1725, czar of Russia 1682–1725.
2.
(Peter Karageorgevich) 1844–1921, king of Serbia 1903–21.

Pompey

[pom-pee]
noun
(Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus"the Great") 106–48 b.c, Roman general and statesman: a member of the first triumvirate.

Theodosius I

[thee-uh-doh-shee-uhs, -shuhs]
noun
("the Great") a.d. 346?–395, Roman emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire 379–395.

Waldemar I

[vahl-duh-mahr]
noun
("the Great") 1131–82, king of Denmark 1157–82.
Also, Valdemar I.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To the great
Collins
World English Dictionary
Akbar (ˈækbɑː)
 
n
called Akbar the Great. 1542--1605, Mogul emperor of India (1556--1605), who extended the Mogul empire to include N India

basil (ˈbæzəl)
 
n
1.  Also called: sweet basil a Eurasian plant, Ocimum basilicum, having spikes of small white flowers and aromatic leaves used as herbs for seasoning: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
2.  Also called: wild basil a European plant, Satureja vulgaris (or Clinopodium vulgare), with dense clusters of small pink or whitish flowers: family Lamiaceae
3.  basil-thyme a European plant, Acinos arvensis, having clusters of small violet-and-white flowers: family Lamiaceae
 
[C15: from Old French basile, from Late Latin basilicum, from Greek basilikon, from basilikos royal, from basileus king]

Basil (ˈbæzəl)
 
n
Saint, called the Great, ?329--379 ad, Greek patriarch: an opponent of Arianism and one of the founders of monasticism. Feast day: Jan 2, June 14, or Jan 1

Constantine I (ˈkɒnstənˌtaɪn, -ˌtiːn)
 
n
1.  known as Constantine the Great. Latin name Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus. ?280--337 ad, first Christian Roman emperor (306--337): moved his capital to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (330)
2.  1868--1923, king of Greece (1913--17; 1920--22): deposed (1917), recalled by a plebiscite (1920), but forced to abdicate again (1922) after defeat by the Turks

Cyrus (ˈsaɪrəs)
 
n
1.  known as Cyrus the Great or Cyrus the Elder. died ?529 bc, king of Persia and founder of the Persian empire
2.  anabasis See also katabasis called the Younger. died 401 bc, Persian satrap of Lydia: revolted against his brother Artaxerxes II, but was killed at the battle of Cunaxa

Darius I (dəˈraɪəs)
 
n
known as Darius the Great, surname Hystaspis. ?550--486 bc, king of Persia (521--486), who extended the Persian empire and crushed the revolt of the Ionian city states (500). He led two expeditions against Greece but was defeated at Marathon (490)

Herod (ˈhɛrəd)
 
n
called the Great. ?73--4 bc, king of Judaea (37--4). The latter part of his reign was notable for his cruelty: according to the New Testament he ordered the Massacre of the Innocents

John I
 
n
1.  surnamed Tzimisces. 925--976 ad, Byzantine emperor (969--976): extended Byzantine power into Bulgaria and Syria
2.  called the Great. 1357--1433, king of Portugal (1385--1433). He secured independence for Portugal by his victory over Castile (1385) and initiated Portuguese overseas expansion

Louis XIV
 
n
known as le roi soleil (the Sun King). 1638--1715, king of France (1643--1715); son of Louis XIII and Anne of Austria. Effective ruler from 1661, he established an absolute monarchy. His attempt to establish French supremacy in Europe, waging almost continual wars from 1667 to 1714, ultimately failed. But his reign is regarded as a golden age of French literature and art

Medici (ˈmɛdɪtʃɪ, məˈdiːtʃɪ, Italian ˈmɛːditʃi, medisis)
 
n
1.  an Italian family of bankers, merchants, and rulers of Florence and Tuscany, prominent in Italian political and cultural history in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, including
2.  Catherine de' (kaˈtriːn de). See Catherine de' Medici
3.  Cosimo I (ˈkɔːzimo), known as Cosimo the Great. 1519--74, duke of Florence and first grand duke of Tuscany (1569--74)
4.  Cosimo de', known as Cosimo the Elder. 1389--1464, Italian banker, statesman, and patron of arts, who established the political power of the family in Florence (1434)
5.  Giovanni de', (dʒoˈvanni de). See Leo X
6.  Giulio de' (ˈdʒuːljo de). See Clement VII
7.  Lorenzo de' (loˈrɛntso de), known as Lorenzo the Magnificent. 1449--92, Italian statesman, poet, and scholar; ruler of Florence (1469--92) and first patron of Michelangelo
8.  Maria de' (maˈriːa de). See Maria de' Medici
 
Medicean
 
adj

Mithridates VI or Mithradates VI (ˌmɪθrɪˈdeɪtiːz)
 
n
called the Great. ?132--63 bc, king of Pontus (?120--63). He waged three wars against Rome (88--84; 83--81; 74--64) and was finally defeated by Pompey: committed suicide
 
Mithradates VI or Mithradates VI
 
n

Otto I or Otho I (ˈɒtəʊ)
 
n
called the Great. 912--73 ad, king of Germany (936--73); Holy Roman Emperor (962--73)
 
Otho I or Otho I
 
n

Peter I
 
n
known as Peter the Great. 1672--1725, tsar of Russia (1682--1725), who assumed sole power in 1689. He introduced many reforms in government, technology, and the western European ideas. He also acquired new territories for Russia in the Baltic and founded the new capital of St Petersburg (1703)

Pompey1 (ˈpɒmpɪ)
 
n
an informal name for Portsmouth

Pompey2 (ˈpɒmpɪ)
 
n
called Pompey the Great; Latin name Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus. 106--48 bc, Roman general and statesman; a member with Caesar and Crassus of the first triumvirate (60). He later quarrelled with Caesar, who defeated him at Pharsalus (48). He fled to Egypt and was murdered

Theodosius I (ˌθɪəˈdəʊsɪəs)
 
n
called the Great. ?346--395 ad, Roman emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire (379--95) and of the Western Roman Empire (392--95)

Waldemar I or Valdemar I (ˈvældɪˌmɑː)
 
n
known as Waldemar the Great. 1131--82, king of Denmark (1157--82). He conquered the Wends (1169), increased the territory of Denmark, and established the hereditary rule of his line
 
Valdemar I or Valdemar I
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Cyrus
L., from Gk. Kyros, from O.Pers. Kurush, a name of unknown etymology. In Heb., Koresh, and in that form taken c.1990 by Wayne Howell of Texas, U.S., when he became head of the Branch Davidian cult there.

basil
"aromatic shrubby plant," early 15c., from O.Fr. basile (15c., Mod.Fr. basilic), from M.L. basilicum, from Gk. basilikon (phyton) "royal (plant)," from basileus "king" (see Basil). So called, probably, because it was believed to have been used in making royal perfumes. In
Latin, confused with basiliscus (see basilisk) because it was supposed to be an antidote to the basilisk's venom.

Basil
masc. proper name, from L. Basilius, from Gk. Basileios "kingly, royal," from basileus "king," of unknown origin, possibly from a language of Asia Minor (cf. Lydian battos "king").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Medici [(med-uh-chee)]

A family of skilled politicians and patrons of the arts who lived in Florence, Italy, during the Renaissance. (See Lorenzo de Medici.)

Note: The family produced two queens of France: Catherine, in the sixteenth century, and Marie, in the seventeenth.
Louis XIV [(looh-ee)]

A king of France in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Louis was known as the Sun King for his power and splendor. By inviting French nobles to live in luxury at his palace at Versailles, he removed them as threats and greatly increased his own power. He is known for saying, “L'état, c'est moi” (“I am the state”).

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Cyrus definition


(Heb. Ko'resh), the celebrated "King of Persia" (Elam) who was conqueror of Babylon, and issued the decree of liberation to the Jews (Ezra 1:1, 2). He was the son of Cambyses, the prince of Persia, and was born about B.C. 599. In the year B.C. 559 he became king of Persia, the kingdom of Media being added to it partly by conquest. Cyrus was a great military leader, bent on universal conquest. Babylon fell before his army (B.C. 538) on the night of Belshazzar's feast (Dan. 5:30), and then the ancient dominion of Assyria was also added to his empire (cf., "Go up, O Elam", Isa.21:2). Hitherto the great kings of the earth had only oppressed the Jews. Cyrus was to them as a "shepherd" (Isa. 44:28; 45:1). God employed him in doing service to his ancient people. He may posibly have gained, through contact with the Jews, some knowledge of their religion. The "first year of Cyrus" (Ezra 1:1) is not the year of his elevation to power over the Medes, nor over the Persians, nor the year of the fall of Babylon, but the year succeeding the two years during which "Darius the Mede" was viceroy in Babylon after its fall. At this time only (B.C. 536) Cyrus became actual king over Palestine, which became a part of his Babylonian empire. The edict of Cyrus for the rebuilding of Jerusalem marked a great epoch in the history of the Jewish people (2 Chr. 36:22, 23; Ezra 1:1-4; 4:3; 5:13-17; 6:3-5). This decree was discovered "at Achmetha [R.V. marg., "Ecbatana"], in the palace that is in the province of the Medes" (Ezra 6:2). A chronicle drawn up just after the conquest of Babylonia by Cyrus, gives the history of the reign of Nabonidus (Nabunahid), the last king of Babylon, and of the fall of the Babylonian empire. In B.C. 538 there was a revolt in Southern Babylonia, while the army of Cyrus entered the country from the north. In June the Babylonian army was completely defeated at Opis, and immediately afterwards Sippara opened its gates to the conqueror. Gobryas (Ugbaru), the governor of Kurdistan, was then sent to Babylon, which surrendered "without fighting," and the daily services in the temples continued without a break. In October, Cyrus himself arrived, and proclaimed a general amnesty, which was communicated by Gobryas to "all the province of Babylon," of which he had been made governor. Meanwhile, Nabonidus, who had concealed himself, was captured, but treated honourably; and when his wife died, Cambyses, the son of Cyrus, conducted the funeral. Cyrus now assumed the title of "king of Babylon," claimed to be the descendant of the ancient kings, and made rich offerings to the temples. At the same time he allowed the foreign populations who had been deported to Babylonia to return to their old homes, carrying with them the images of their gods. Among these populations were the Jews, who, as they had no images, took with them the sacred vessels of the temple.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;