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thinnish

[thin-ish] /ˈθɪn ɪʃ/
adjective
1.
somewhat thin.
Origin of thinnish
1535-1545
1535-45; thin + -ish1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for thinnish
Historical Examples
  • No, he would be what we would describe as a thinnish individual, that is very thin; was wiry rather than bulky muscles.

    Warren Commission (3 of 26): Hearings Vol. III (of 15) The President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy
  • He is tall and thinnish, with sandy hair and cold gray eyes.

    Dear Enemy Jean Webster
  • She was good-looking enough, in her thinnish, solemn way, but it seemed to me she was kind of overdressed and too grand.

    In the Arena Booth Tarkington
  • There are 12 thinnish cross lines, each with four upward angles.

    Mohave Pottery Alfred L. Kroeber
  • Do you like a thinnish fall of golden hair, or an abundant cluster of nut-brown?

    Rhoda Fleming, Complete George Meredith
  • Then that thinnish fellow with the hair like a hearth-brush–did you meet him?

    Aurora the Magnificent Gertrude Hall
  • A variant is to add sugar towards the last, enough to make a thinnish syrup, which is of itself a good sauce for simple desserts.

    Dishes & Beverages of the Old South Martha McCulloch Williams
  • Except in a storm, the night of the open always is thinnish, so you can see after your eyes are used to it.

    Pluck on the Long Trail Edwin L. Sabin
  • This country, except at the village and town just mentioned, is very open, a thinnish soil upon a bed of chalk.

    Rural Rides William Cobbett
  • The Alpine Club man looked at me, especially  regarding my somewhat slight figure and thinnish legs.

    A Chosen Few Frank R. Stockton

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14
14
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