thistlelike

thistle

[this-uhl]
noun
1.
any of various prickly, composite plants having showy, purple flower heads, especially of the genera Cirsium, Carduus, or Onopordum.
2.
any of various other prickly plants.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English thistel, Old English; cognate with Dutch distel, German Distel, Old Norse thistill

thistlelike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
thistle (ˈθɪsəl)
 
n
1.  any of numerous plants of the genera Cirsium,Carduus, and related genera, having prickly-edged leaves, pink, purple, yellow, or white dense flower heads, and feathery hairs on the seeds: family Asteraceae (composites)
2.  a thistle, or a representation of one, as the national emblem of Scotland
 
[Old English thīstel, related to Old Saxon, Old High German thīstil, Old Norse thīstill]
 
'thistly
 
adj

Thistle (ˈθɪsəl)
 
n
1.  See Order of the Thistle
2.  (sometimes not capital)
 a.  the emblem of this Order
 b.  membership of this Order

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

thistle
prickly herbaceous plant, O.E. þistel, from P.Gmc. *thikhstula (cf. O.H.G. distil, Ger. Distel, O.N. þistell, Dan. tidsel), of unknown origin. Emblem of Scotland since 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Thistle definition


(1.) Heb. hoah (2 Kings 14:9; Job 31:40). In Job 41:2 the Hebrew word is rendered "thorn," but in the Revised Version "hook." It is also rendered "thorn" in 2 Chr. 33:11; Prov. 26:9; Cant. 2:2; "brambles" in Isa. 34:13. It is supposed to be a variety of the wild plum-tree, but by some it is regarded as the common thistle, of which there are many varieties in Palestine. (2.) Heb. dardar, meaning "a plant growing luxuriantly" (Gen. 3:18; Hos. 10:8); Gr. tribolos, "a triple point" (Matt. 7:16; Heb. 6:8, "brier," R.V. "thistle"). This was probably the star-thistle, called by botanists Centaurea calcitropa, or "caltrops," a weed common in corn-fields. (See THORNS.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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