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Stories We Like: A Guide to the Comma

Gresham

[gresh-uh m] /ˈgrɛʃ əm/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas, 1519?–79, English merchant and financier.
2.
a town in NW Oregon.

Lawrence

[lawr-uh ns, lor-] /ˈlɔr əns, ˈlɒr-/
noun
1.
D(avid) H(erbert) 1885–1930, English novelist.
2.
Ernest O(rlando) 1901–58, U.S. physicist: inventor of the cyclotron; Nobel Prize 1939.
3.
Gertrude, 1901?–52, English actress.
4.
Jacob, 1917–2000, U.S. painter and educator.
5.
James, 1781–1813, U.S. naval officer in the War of 1812.
6.
Saint. Also, Lorenzo. Latin Laurentius, died a.d. 258? early church martyr.
7.
Sir Thomas, 1769–1830, English painter.
8.
T(homas) E(dward) (T. E. Shaw"Lawrence of Arabia") 1888–1935, English archaeologist, adventurer, soldier, and writer.
9.
a city in NE Massachusetts, on the Merrimack River.
10.
a city in E Kansas, on the Kansas River.
11.
a town in central Indiana.
12.
a male given name: from a Latin word meaning “a man of Laurentum.”.

Littleton

[lit-l-tuh n] /ˈlɪt l tən/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas, c1407–1481, English jurist and author.
2.
a town in NE Colorado.

Malory

[mal-uh-ree] /ˈmæl ə ri/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas, c1400–71, English author.

More

[mawr, mohr] /mɔr, moʊr/
noun
1.
Hannah, 1745–1833, English writer on religious subjects.
2.
Paul Elmer, 1864–1937, U.S. essayist, critic, and editor.
3.
Sir Thomas, 1478–1535, English humanist, statesman, and author: canonized in 1935.

North

[nawrth] /nɔrθ/
noun
1.
Christopher, pen name of John Wilson.
2.
Frederick, 2nd Earl of Guilford
[gil-ferd] /ˈgɪl fərd/ (Show IPA),
("Lord North") 1732–92, British statesman: prime minister 1770–82.
3.
Sir Thomas, 1535?–1601? English translator.
Related forms
pro-North, adjective

Urquhart

[ur-kert, -kahrt] /ˈɜr kərt, -kɑrt/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas, 1611–60, Scottish author and translator.

Wyatt

[wahy-uh t] /ˈwaɪ ət/
noun
1.
James, 1746–1813, English architect.
2.
Sir Thomas, 1503?–42, English poet and diplomat.
3.
a male given name.
Also, Wyat (for defs 2, 3).

Beecham

[bee-chuh m] /ˈbi tʃəm/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas, 1879–1961, English conductor and impresario.

Browne

[broun] /braʊn/
noun
1.
Charles Farrer
[far-er] /ˈfær ər/ (Show IPA),
("Artemus Ward") 1834–67, U.S. humorist.
2.
Sir Thomas, 1605–82, English physician and author.

Dale

[deyl] /deɪl/
noun
1.
Sir Henry Hallett
[hal-it] /ˈhæl ɪt/ (Show IPA),
1875–1968, English physiologist: Nobel Prize in Medicine 1936.
2.
Sir Thomas, died 1619, British colonial administrator in America: governor of Virginia 1614–16.
3.
a male or female given name.

Elyot

[el-ee-uh t, el-yuh t] /ˈɛl i ət, ˈɛl yət/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas, c1490–1546, English scholar and diplomat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for thomas, sir

Beecham

/ˈbiːtʃəm/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas. 1879–1961, English conductor who did much to promote the works of Delius, Sibelius, and Richard Strauss

Browne

/braʊn/
noun
1.
Coral (Edith). 1913–91, Australian actress: married to Vincent Price
2.
Hablot Knight. See Phiz
3.
Sir Thomas. 1605–82, English physician and author, noted for his magniloquent prose style. His works include Religio Medici (1642) and Hydriotaphia or Urn Burial (1658)

dale

/deɪl/
noun
1.
an open valley, usually in an area of low hills
Word Origin
Old English dæl; related to Old Frisian del, Old Norse dalr, Old High German tal valley

Dale

/deɪl/
noun
1.
Sir Henry Hallet. 1875–1968, English physiologist: shared a Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1936 with Otto Loewi for their work on the chemical transmission of nerve impulses

Elyot

/ˈɛlɪət/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas. ?1490–1546, English scholar and diplomat; author of The Boke named the Governour (1531), a treatise in English on education

Gresham

/ˈɡrɛʃəm/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas. ?1519–79, English financier, who founded the Royal Exchange in London (1568)

Lawrence

/ˈlɒrəns/
noun
1.
Saint. died 258 ad, Roman martyr: according to tradition he was roasted to death on a gridiron. Feast day: Aug 10
2.
D(avid) H(erbert). 1885–1930, British novelist, poet, and short-story writer. Many of his works deal with the destructiveness of modern industrial society, contrasted with the beauty of nature and instinct, esp the sexual impulse. His novels include Sons and Lovers (1913), The Rainbow (1915), Women in Love (1920), and Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928)
3.
Ernest Orlando. 1901–58, US physicist, who invented the cyclotron (1931): Nobel prize for physics 1939
4.
Gertrude. 1898–1952, British actress, noted esp for her roles in comedies such as Noël Coward's Private Lives (1930)
5.
Sir Thomas. 1769–1830, British portrait painter
6.
T(homas) E(dward), known as Lawrence of Arabia. 1888–1935, British soldier and writer. He took a major part in the Arab revolt against the Turks (1916–18), proving himself an outstanding guerrilla leader. He described his experiences in The Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1926)

Malory

/ˈmælərɪ/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas. 15th-century English author of Le Morte d'Arthur (?1470), a prose collection of Arthurian legends, translated from the French

more

/mɔː/
determiner
1.
  1. the comparative of much, many more joy than you know, more pork sausages
  2. (as pronoun; functioning as sing or plural) he has more than she has, even more are dying every day
2.
  1. additional; further no more bananas
  2. (as pronoun; functioning as sing or plural) I can't take any more, more than expected
3.
more of, to a greater extent or degree we see more of Sue these days, more of a nuisance than it should be
adverb
4.
used to form the comparative of some adjectives and adverbs a more believable story, more quickly
5.
the comparative of much people listen to the radio more now
6.
additionally; again I'll look at it once more
7.
more or less
  1. as an estimate; approximately
  2. to an unspecified extent or degree the party was ruined, more or less
8.
more so, to a greater extent or degree
9.
neither more nor less than, simply
10.
think more of, to have a higher opinion of
11.
what is more, moreover
Word Origin
Old English māra; compare Old Saxon, Old High German mēro, Gothic maiza. See also most

More

/mɔː/
noun
1.
Hannah. 1745–1833, English writer, noted for her religious tracts, esp The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain
2.
Sir Thomas. 1478–1535, English statesman, humanist, and Roman Catholic Saint; Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII (1529–32). His opposition to the annulment of Henry's marriage to Catherine of Aragon and his refusal to recognize the Act of Supremacy resulted in his execution on a charge of treason. In Utopia (1516) he set forth his concept of the ideal state. Feast day: June 22 or July 6

north

/nɔːθ/
noun
1.
one of the four cardinal points of the compass, at 0° or 360°, that is 90° from east and west and 180° from south
2.
the direction along a meridian towards the North Pole
3.
the direction in which a compass needle points; magnetic north
4.
(often capital) the North, any area lying in or towards the north related adjectives arctic boreal
5.
(cards) (usually capital) the player or position at the table corresponding to north on the compass
adjective
6.
situated in, moving towards, or facing the north
7.
(esp of the wind) from the north
adverb
8.
in, to, or towards the north
9.
(archaic) (of the wind) from the north
N
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse northr, Dutch noord, Old High German nord

North1

/nɔːθ/
noun the North
1.
the northern area of England, generally regarded as reaching approximately the southern boundaries of Yorkshire and Lancashire
2.
(in the US) the area approximately north of Maryland and the Ohio River, esp those states north of the Mason-Dixon Line that were known as the Free States during the Civil War
3.
the northern part of North America, esp the area consisting of Alaska, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut; the North Country
4.
the countries of the world that are economically and technically advanced
5.
(poetic) the north wind
adjective
6.
  1. of or denoting the northern part of a specified country, area, etc
  2. (as part of a name) North Africa

North2

/nɔːθ/
noun
1.
Frederick, 2nd Earl of Guildford, called Lord North. 1732–92, British statesman; prime minister (1770–82), dominated by George III. He was held responsible for the loss of the American colonies
2.
Sir Thomas. ?1535–?1601, English translator of Plutarch's Lives (1579), which was the chief source of Shakespeare's Roman plays

Urquhart

/ˈɜːkət/
noun
1.
Sir Thomas. 1611–60, Scottish author and translator of Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel (1653; 1693)

Wyatt

/ˈwaɪət/
noun
1.
James. 1746–1813, British architect; a pioneer of the Gothic Revival
2.
Sir Thomas. ?1503–42, English poet at the court of Henry VIII
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for thomas, sir
dale
O.E. dæl, from P.Gmc. *dalan "valley," preserved from extinction in north of England by Norse infl. Akin to words for "bow" (v.), probably through the notion of a bend in the ground.
north
O.E. norð, from P.Gmc. *nurtha- (cf. O.N. norðr, O.Fris. north, M.Du. nort, Du. noord, Ger. nord), possibly ult. from PIE *ner- "left," also "below," as north is to the left when one faces the rising sun (cf. Skt. narakah "hell," Gk. enerthen "from beneath," Oscan-Umbrian nertrak "left"). The same notion underlies Ir. tuaisceart "north." The usual word for "north" in the Romance languages is ultimately from English, cf. O.Fr. north (Fr. nord), borrowed from O.E. norð; It., Sp. norte are borrowed from O.Fr. North-easter "wind blowing from the northeast" is from 1794. North American first used 1766, by Franklin. Northwest Passage first attested 1600. Northerner in U.S. geo-political sense is attested from 1831. Northern lights "aurora borealis" first recorded 1721. North Star "Pole Star" is M.E. norþe sterre (1398, cf. M.Du. noirdstern, Ger. nordstern).
more
O.E. mara (adj.) "greater, more," used as a comp. of micel "great" (see mickle), from P.Gmc. *maizon (cf. O.S. mera, O.N. meiri, O.Fris. mara, M.Du. mere, O.H.G. mero, Ger. mehr), from PIE *meis (cf. Avestan mazja "greater," O.Ir. mor "great," Gk. -moros "great," Oscan mais "more"). O.E. used related ma "more" as adv., n., from P.Gmc. *mais; this became M.E. mo, but more in this sense began to predominate in later M.E.
"Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.

"I've had nothing yet," Alice replied in an offended tone, "so I can't take more."

"You mean you can't take less," said the Hatter: "it's very easy to take more than nothing."
Lawrence
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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thomas, sir in Medicine

Dale (dāl), Sir Henry Hallett. 1875-1968.

British physiologist. He shared a 1936 Nobel Prize for work on the chemical transmission of nerve impulses, particularly for the isolation and study of acetylcholine (1914).

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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thomas, sir in Science
Dale
  (dāl)   
British physiologist who discovered acetylcholine and, with Otto Loewi, investigated the chemical transmission of nerve impulses. For this work they shared the 1936 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
Lawrence
  (lôr'əns)   
American physicist who in 1929 built the first cyclotron, which he used to study the structure of the atom, transmute elements, and produce artificial radiation. His work laid the foundation for the development of the atomic bomb.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for thomas, sir

north

adverb

In the direction of increase; upward: A few months ago the cost of a 4-megabit memory chip was $11 on the spot market. Last week, it was $20 and heading north (1864+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Related Abbreviations for thomas, sir

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Minority Outreach Research and Education
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Idioms and Phrases with thomas, sir
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for thomas, sir

Lawrence

city, seat (1855) of Douglas county, eastern Kansas, U.S. It lies on the Kansas River. It was founded in 1854 by antislavery radicals who had come to Kansas under the auspices of the New England Emigrant Aid Company to outvote proslavery settlers and thus make Kansas a "free" state. The city was named for Amos A. Lawrence, a New England textile manufacturer who funded the company's settlement efforts. It was a noted station on the Underground Railroad by which slaves escaped into free territory. As a Jayhawker (abolitionist) headquarters, the town was sacked in 1856 by a proslavery militia under David Rice Atchison, a former Democratic senator from Missouri, and in 1863 by Confederate guerrillas under the command of William Clarke Quantrill, who massacred more than 150 citizens and burned much of the city.

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Littleton

city, seat (1904) of Arapahoe county, north-central Colorado, U.S. Parts of the city also lie within Douglas and Jefferson counties. Located 11 miles (18 km) south of Denver, the city arose on the site of a flour mill and granary established in 1867 to serve the gold camps in the Rocky Mountain foothills farther west. Named for Richard Sullivan Little, a hydraulic engineer who purchased a large tract of land and settled in the area, it was designated the village of Littleton in 1872, a year after the railroad arrived there. The local economy was largely agricultural until World War II, when several war-materiel plants were built; many of those were converted to aerospace production after the war. Much of the original city centre was heavily damaged in a 1965 flood of the South Platte River, after which new housing developments were constructed

Learn more about Littleton with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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