thrilling

[thril-ing]
adjective
1.
producing sudden, strong, and deep emotion or excitement.
2.
producing a tremor, as by chilling.
3.
vibrating; trembling; quivering.

Origin:
1520–30; thrill + -ing2

thrillingly, adverb
unthrilling, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

thrill

[thril]
verb (used with object)
1.
to affect with a sudden wave of keen emotion or excitement, as to produce a tremor or tingling sensation through the body.
2.
to utter or send forth tremulously, as a melody.
verb (used without object)
3.
to affect one with a wave of emotion or excitement.
4.
to be stirred by a tremor or tingling sensation of emotion or excitement: He thrilled at the thought of home.
5.
to cause a prickling or tingling sensation; throb.
6.
to move tremulously; vibrate; quiver.
noun
7.
a sudden wave of keen emotion or excitement, sometimes manifested as a tremor or tingling sensation passing through the body.
8.
something that produces or is capable of producing such a sensation: a story full of thrills.
9.
a thrilling experience: It was a thrill to see Paris again.
10.
a vibration or quivering.
11.
Pathology. an abnormal tremor or vibration, as in the respiratory or vascular system.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English thrillen orig., to penetrate, metathetic variant of thirlen to thirl

subthrill, noun
unthrilled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
thrill (θrɪl)
 
n
1.  a sudden sensation of excitement and pleasure: seeing his book for sale gave him a thrill
2.  a situation producing such a sensation: it was a thrill to see Rome for the first time
3.  a trembling sensation caused by fear or emotional shock
4.  pathol an abnormal slight tremor associated with a heart or vascular murmur, felt on palpation
 
vb
5.  to feel or cause to feel a thrill
6.  to tremble or cause to tremble; vibrate or quiver
 
[Old English thӯrlian to pierce, from thyrel hole; see nostril, through]

thrilling (ˈθrɪlɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  very exciting or stimulating
2.  vibrating or trembling
 
thrillingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

thrill
c.1300, "to pierce, penetrate," metathesis of O.E. þyrlian, from þyrel "hole" (in M.E., also "nostril"), from þurh "through" (cf. M.H.G. dürchel "pierced, perforated") + -el. Meaning "give a shivering, exciting feeling" is first recorded 1592, via metaphoric notion of "pierce with
emotion." The noun in this sense is from 1680; meaning "a thrilling experience" is attested from 1936. Thriller "sensational story" is from 1889.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

thrill (thrĭl)
n.
The vibration accompanying a cardiac or vascular murmur, detectible on palpation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Without poverty, there wouldn't be the exciting knowledge of the real-the thrilling hint of danger.
And that brings us to the thrilling details of size and shape.
As a beginning artist the chance to participate in such a project was thrilling.
The fourteen basic structures are less than thrilling.
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