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throb

[throb] /θrɒb/
verb (used without object), throbbed, throbbing.
1.
to beat with increased force or rapidity, as the heart under the influence of emotion or excitement; palpitate.
2.
to feel or exhibit emotion:
He throbbed at the happy thought.
3.
to pulsate; vibrate:
The cello throbbed.
noun
4.
the act of throbbing.
5.
a violent beat or pulsation, as of the heart.
6.
any pulsation or vibration:
the throb of engines.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English *throbben, implied in present participle throbbant throbbing < ?
Related forms
throbber, noun
throbbingly, adverb
outthrob, verb (used with object), outthrobbed, outthrobbing.
unthrobbing, adjective
Synonyms
3. See pulsate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for throbbed
  • Dot's anxious thoughts throbbed against the lean palm.
  • Music throbbed, drinks flowed, and soon the couples headed for the exits.
  • throbbed, unabated, through the furthest reaches of their being.
  • Up above the moon throbbed full, and the clouds it raced through seemed to be the moon's clouds rather than our clouds.
  • Her left hip throbbed alive, commemorating another night spent bearing her weight against a less than forgiving carpet.
  • The aching started in my head and spread through my body until my entire being throbbed.
  • After reading a few lines he frowned and his heart throbbed with anguish.
  • On the contrary, as though to spite him, it throbbed more and more violently.
  • Her backside throbbed, but in that moment the pain didn't even register.
  • Her heart throbbed, telling her she should be out there with the knights training to protect the king, but it was impossible.
British Dictionary definitions for throbbed

throb

/θrɒb/
verb (intransitive) throbs, throbbing, throbbed
1.
to pulsate or beat repeatedly, esp with increased force to throb with pain
2.
(of engines, drums, etc) to have a strong rhythmic vibration or beat
noun
3.
the act or an instance of throbbing, esp a rapid pulsation as of the heart a throb of pleasure
Derived Forms
throbbing, adjective
throbbingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: perhaps of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for throbbed

throb

v.

mid-14c., of uncertain origin, perhaps meant to represent in sound the pulsation of arteries and veins or the heart. Related: Throbbed; throbbing. The noun is first attested 1570s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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throbbed in Medicine

throb (thrŏb)
v. throbbed, throb·bing, throbs
To beat rapidly or perceptibly, such as occurs in the heart or a constricted blood vessel. n.
A strong or rapid beat; a pulsation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Slang definitions & phrases for throbbed

throb

Related Terms

heartthrob


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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16
17
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