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throb

[throb] /θrɒb/
verb (used without object), throbbed, throbbing.
1.
to beat with increased force or rapidity, as the heart under the influence of emotion or excitement; palpitate.
2.
to feel or exhibit emotion:
He throbbed at the happy thought.
3.
to pulsate; vibrate:
The cello throbbed.
noun
4.
the act of throbbing.
5.
a violent beat or pulsation, as of the heart.
6.
any pulsation or vibration:
the throb of engines.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English *throbben, implied in present participle throbbant throbbing < ?
Related forms
throbber, noun
throbbingly, adverb
outthrob, verb (used with object), outthrobbed, outthrobbing.
unthrobbing, adjective
Synonyms
3. See pulsate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for throbbing
  • For today, here's something innocuous and cool: throbbing oil drops.
  • Even so, there are cities where the throbbing beat of civilization creates a dynamic tension.
  • It constricts cerebral blood vessels, and when they reopen, you get a throbbing headache.
  • The resulting pain is usually described as deep and throbbing.
  • But on closer inspection this is not a building throbbing with life, or even quiet contemplation.
  • Two seemingly moribund staples, the musical and the comic drama, have come throbbing back to life.
  • They depend too heavily on borrowing: many drank themselves silly during the credit boom and now have throbbing heads.
  • By this point, my head was throbbing with deep thoughts.
  • If the logo is throbbing blue, the car is fully charged.
  • Hear the throbbing of space it is the steps of a season in heat across the embers of the year.
British Dictionary definitions for throbbing

throb

/θrɒb/
verb (intransitive) throbs, throbbing, throbbed
1.
to pulsate or beat repeatedly, esp with increased force: to throb with pain
2.
(of engines, drums, etc) to have a strong rhythmic vibration or beat
noun
3.
the act or an instance of throbbing, esp a rapid pulsation as of the heart: a throb of pleasure
Derived Forms
throbbing, adjective
throbbingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: perhaps of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for throbbing

throb

v.

mid-14c., of uncertain origin, perhaps meant to represent in sound the pulsation of arteries and veins or the heart. Related: Throbbed; throbbing. The noun is first attested 1570s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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throbbing in Medicine

throb (thrŏb)
v. throbbed, throb·bing, throbs
To beat rapidly or perceptibly, such as occurs in the heart or a constricted blood vessel. n.
A strong or rapid beat; a pulsation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Slang definitions & phrases for throbbing

throb

Related Terms

heartthrob


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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17
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