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throng

[thrawng, throng] /θrɔŋ, θrɒŋ/
noun
1.
a multitude of people crowded or assembled together; crowd.
2.
a great number of things crowded or considered together:
a throng of memories.
3.
Chiefly Scot. pressure, as of work.
verb (used without object)
4.
to assemble, collect, or go in large numbers; crowd.
verb (used with object)
5.
to crowd or press upon; jostle.
6.
to fill or occupy with or as with a crowd:
He thronged the picture with stars.
7.
to bring or drive together into or as into a crowd, heap, or collection.
8.
to fill by crowding or pressing into:
They thronged the small room.
adjective, Scot. and North England
9.
filled with people or objects; crowded.
10.
(of time) filled with things to do; busy.
Origin
1000
before 1000; (noun) Middle English; Old English gethrang; cognate with Dutch drang, German Drang pressure, Old Norse thrǫng throng; (adj. and v.) Middle English; akin to the noun; compare obsolete thring to press
Related forms
interthronging, adjective
overthrong, verb
unthronged, adjective
Synonyms
1. horde, host; assemblage. See crowd1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for throngs
  • When the summer throngs depart, you get this seaside arts town and its beaches all to yourself.
  • throngs of students were out that day, lounging in the kind of late-summer sunlight that keeps brochure photographers in business.
  • throngs sang dirges in the street, mud caked upon their heads.
  • Of own, of abrupt self there so thrusts on, so throngs the ear.
  • Who was queen of all the maidens, peer among the lily throngs.
  • At any rate, the faithful turned out in pious and splendidly dressed throngs to pay their devoir.
  • There are usually throngs of people and bumper-to-bumper traffic.
  • As intense as politics can get, few candidates are experienced in encountering throngs of screaming, face-painted partisans.
  • Sit at the end of the bar and avert your eyes from the throngs of thirsty guests.
  • In a matter of days, the throngs have all disappeared.
British Dictionary definitions for throngs

throng

/θrɒŋ/
noun
1.
a great number of people or things crowded together
verb
2.
to gather in or fill (a place) in large numbers; crowd
3.
(transitive) to hem in (a person); jostle
adjective
4.
(Yorkshire, dialect) (postpositive) busy
Word Origin
Old English gethrang; related to Old Norse throng, Old High German drangōd
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for throngs

throng

n.

c.1300, probably shortened from Old English geþrang "crowd, tumult" (related to verb þringan "to push, crowd, press"), from Proto-Germanic *thrangan (cf. Old Norse þröng, Dutch drang, German Drang "crowd, throng").

v.

"go in a crowd," 1530s, from throng (n.). Related: Thronged; thronging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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