thwart

[thwawrt]
verb (used with object)
1.
to oppose successfully; prevent from accomplishing a purpose.
2.
to frustrate or baffle (a plan, purpose, etc.).
3.
Archaic.
a.
to cross.
b.
to extend across.
noun
4.
a seat across a boat, especially one used by a rower.
5.
a transverse member spreading the gunwales of a canoe or the like.
adjective
6.
passing or lying crosswise or across; cross; transverse.
7.
perverse; obstinate.
8.
adverse; unfavorable.
preposition, adverb
9.
across; athwart.

Origin:
1200–50; Middle English thwert (adv.) < Old Norse thvert across, neuter of thverr transverse; cognate with Old English thweorh crooked, cross, Gothic thwairhs cross, angry

thwartedly, adverb
thwarter, noun
unthwarted, adjective
unthwarting, adjective


1. hinder, obstruct. Thwart, frustrate, baffle imply preventing one, more or less completely, from accomplishing a purpose. Thwart and frustrate apply to purposes, actions, plans, etc., baffle to the psychological state of the person thwarted. Thwart suggests stopping one by opposing, blocking, or in some way running counter to one's efforts. Frustrate implies rendering all attempts or efforts useless or ineffectual, so that nothing ever comes of them. Baffle suggests causing defeat by confusing, puzzling, or perplexing, so that a situation seems too hard a problem to understand or solve.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
thwart (θwɔːt)
 
vb
1.  to oppose successfully or prevent; frustrate: they thwarted the plan
2.  obsolete to be or move across
 
n
3.  nautical
 a.  a seat lying across a boat and occupied by an oarsman
 b.  
 
adj
4.  passing or being situated across
5.  archaic perverse or stubborn
 
prep, —adv
6.  obsolete across
 
[C13: from Old Norse thvert, from thverr transverse; related to Old English thweorh crooked, Old High German twerh transverse]
 
'thwartedly
 
adv
 
'thwarter
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

thwart
c.1200, from O.N. þvert "across," originally neut. of thverr (adj.) "transverse, across," cognate with O.E. þweorh "transverse, perverse, angry, cross," from P.Gmc. *thwerkhaz (cf. M.Du. dwers, Du. dwars "cross-grained, contrary," O.H.G. twerh, Ger. quer, Goth. þwairhs "angry"), altered
(by influence of *thwer- "to turn") from *therkh-, from PIE *twork-/*twerk- "twist" (cf. L. torquere "to twist," Skt. tarkuh "spindle," O.C.S. traku "band, girdle," O.H.G. drahsil "turner," Ger. drechseln "to turn on a lathe"). The verb meaning "oppose, hinder" is mid-13c., from the adv. and prep.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There may be, she suggested, something about the combination of those three
  fatty acids that thwarts disease.
The peace thus given them is so far from answering its purposes, that it
  directly thwarts them.
Worse-than-expected economic data thwarts stock rally.
But evolutionary psychology suggests that a larger threat to mental health may
  be the way civilization thwarts civility.
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