thyroxin

thyroxine

[thahy-rok-seen, -sin]
noun
1.
Biochemistry. the thyroid gland hormone that regulates the metabolic rate of the body.
2.
Pharmacology. a commercial form of this compound, obtained from the thyroid glands of animals or synthesized, used in the treatment of hypothyroidism. Symbol: T 4
Also, thyroxin [thahy-rok-sin] .


Origin:
1915–20; thyr- + ox- + in(dol)e (orig. thought to be a chemical component)

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World English Dictionary
thyroxine or thyroxin (θaɪˈrɒksiːn, -sɪn, θaɪˈrɒksɪn)
 
n
the principal hormone produced by the thyroid gland: it increases the metabolic rate of tissues and also controls growth, as in amphibian metamorphosis. It can be synthesized or extracted from the thyroid glands of animals and used to treat hypothyroidism. Chemical name: tetra-iodothyronine; formula: C15H11I4NO4
 
[C19: from thyro- + oxy-² + -ine²]
 
thyroxin or thyroxin
 
n
 
[C19: from thyro- + oxy-² + -ine²]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

thyroxine thy·rox·ine (thī-rŏk'sēn', -sĭn) or thy·rox·in (-rŏk'sĭn)
n.
Abbr. T4
An iodine-containing hormone that is produced by the thyroid gland, increases the rate of cell metabolism, regulates growth, and is made synthetically for treatment of thyroid disorders.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
thyroxine   (thī-rŏk'sēn', -sĭn)  Pronunciation Key 
An iodine-containing hormone secreted by the thyroid gland that increases the rate of cell metabolism and regulates growth. Thyroxine can also be made synthetically for treatment of hypothyroidism.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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