tincture

[tingk-cher]
noun
1.
Pharmacology. a solution of alcohol or of alcohol and water, containing animal, vegetable, or chemical drugs.
2.
a slight infusion, as of some element or quality: A tincture of education had softened his rude manners.
3.
a trace; a smack or smattering; tinge: a tincture of irony.
4.
Heraldry. any of the colors, metals, or furs used for the fields, charges, etc., of an escutcheon or achievement of arms.
5.
a dye or pigment.
verb (used with object), tinctured, tincturing.
6.
to impart a tint or color to; tinge.
7.
to imbue or infuse with something.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English: dye < Latin tīnctūra dyeing. See tinct, -ure

pretincture, noun
untinctured, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To tinctured
Collins
World English Dictionary
tincture (ˈtɪŋktʃə)
 
n
1.  pharmacol a medicinal extract in a solution of alcohol
2.  a tint, colour, or tinge
3.  a slight flavour, aroma, or trace
4.  any one of the colours or either of the metals used on heraldic arms
5.  obsolete a dye or pigment
 
vb
6.  (tr) to give a tint or colour to
 
[C14: from Latin tinctūra a dyeing, from tingere to dye]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tincture
1400, from L. tinctura "act of dyeing or tingeing," from tinctus "dye," pp. of tingere "to tinge, dye, moisten, soak," from PIE base *teng- "to soak" (cf. O.H.G. dunkon "to soak," Gk. tengein "to moisten"). Meaning "solution of medicine in a mixture of alcohol" is first recorded 1646. The verb is recorded
from 1616.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

tincture tinc·ture (tĭngk'chər)
n.

  1. A coloring or dyeing substance.


  2. Abbr. tinct, tr An alcohol solution of a nonvolatile medicine.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Some, indeed, were tinctured with fable and burlesque.
Shows a heart within blood-tinctured, of a veined humanity.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature